The Modern American City Paper 2

The Modern American City Paper 2 - The Bigger Man Breaking...

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The Bigger Man : Breaking Through the Shackles of White Society’s Expectations By Jesse Morris “The Modern American City” HSS 2458 02 Professor Schmitz Paper 2
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Martin Luther King once orated, “Man must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love” (Martin Luther King Jr.). Social equality represents a subconscious goal for mankind, but will it ever be achieved? This question has haunted the creative minds of many philanthropists and activists in the United States for centuries, as they realized that affirmative action needed to take place in order for racist acts to subside. Martin Luther King above has noted the concept of “evolution”, which immediately argues that there is a problem in the roots of the upbringing of all mankind. Three decades prior to King’s renowned success, novelist Richard Wright also had similar inclinations about the state of race relations in the United States. Fueled by the white oppression that caused African American urban riots in post-industrial Chicago, Wright wanted to portray a situation where the effects of racism on society were tragic; He created a plot that could only beg for progression, due to seemingly inexplicable violence. Depicted through Wright’s novel, the Native Son, his protagonist Bigger Thomas uses violence as an avenue to realize his own identity. Bigger not only represents the effect that white society has had on the history of African Americans, but he represents the will and desire for change in the future of race relations in the United States. His character development throughout the Native Son progressed into the ultimate cure for each race; Individual recognition of people should determine who they are, not their native classification. The controversial outlook seen through the pages of the Native Son stemmed from Richard Wright’s determination to write something “so hard and deep that they would have to face it without the consolidation of tears” (Rayson). Although these words seemed insensitive, they appeared to represent some foresight into the future of race relations in the United States during the Civil Rights acts of the 1960’s. Not only was Wright’s fiction novel being written based on his experiences in the impoverished urban living conditions during the early 1930’s in 2
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Chicago, but it wasn’t until the 1960’s that American Government had also noticed a large problem in the urban development of cities such as Detroit, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Newark. On July 28, 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson established the National Advisory Commission
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2008 for the course HSS 2458 taught by Professor Shmitz during the Spring '07 term at Babson College.

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The Modern American City Paper 2 - The Bigger Man Breaking...

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