History II Notes Feb 13

History II Notes Feb 13 - Modern History II Notes The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Modern History II Notes – 2/13/06 The Scramble for Africa European-based powers came to control the entire African continent by the late 19 th  century All the modern nation states that have emerged in Europe are competing to create the most  powerful empires in the world Europeans saw African land as available for the taking Common misconception is that the European dominance over Africa is a result of the slave trade o Many African states during the slave trade actually benefited from the trade and the elite  strengthened their power on the coast o Several generations passed between the slave trade and European political control of  Africa State formation in West Africa and Southern Africa – new political entities during this period,  there is a small European role but it is not central to historical development during this time – not  a seamless transition from slave trade to period of imperial dominance o West Africa (Nigeria) – slave trade was very heavy and dominated by British slavers,  parliament abolished slave trade in 1807 and African merchants who were involved in  the slave trade switched to palm oil production (used to lubricate machinery during the  industrial revolution – highly demanded) Jaja – African merchant and former slave in one of the major canoe houses in  Bonny (port, small African kingdom), learned the trade of canoe houses, gained  authority and bought his freedom, eventually became the most powerful trader in  Bonny, social origin was in slavery and he was resented by the other leading  merchants in Bonny (they thought he didn’t deserve the power) – they ganged up  on him and drove him out of the city, so he formed a rival state (to Bonny) in  Opobo – eventually dominated the palm oil trade from new state, had a powerful  army to defend his interests Canoe houses – transportation firms, involved in bringing slaves down the  Niger River, made the shift to palm oil relatively easily because it was 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 3

History II Notes Feb 13 - Modern History II Notes The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online