Review Essay Questions for the First Examination History 1378 Spring 2016(1)

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Review Essay Questions for the First Examination History 1378 Spring 2016Professor T. TilleryThe essay questions will be divided into “extended response” and “restrictive response.”Extended response essays are more unstructured and require students to demonstrate a greaterscope of his/her knowledge along with your personal insights and conclusions. Restrictive-response questions are short essays in which the responses are specific and limited to thequestion asked.There will be some choice in each section.Extended Essays:I.During the latter half of the nineteenth century, America witnessed an influx ofimmigrants from non-western European countries,and the attempt of African Americans, Asians and Native Americans to realize equalaccess to the country’s social, economic and legal rights. Looking at the Gilded Age,How did Americans respond to these aspirations?
II.Write an essay that explains why labor unions developed as they did in the UnitedStates?
What factors shaped the growth of labor unions during this period?What factors delayed or weakened their growth?What were their limitations and what achievements can they claim.III.Between 1877 and 1900 certain factors converged to produce a clear Americanforeign policy. Discuss those factors and give examples to demonstrate how theywere reflected in America’s move toward a coherent foreign policy.IV.Who were the Progressives? What were their goals? What their limitations and whatachievements can they claim? (The essay will not include Roosevelt’s Progressivism)
efforts to solve the problems caused by urbanization and industrialization. Yet for all the disagreement,many historians seem to concur that the spirit and methods of Progressivism came from the native-born, urban middle and upper-middle classes: from doctors, lawyers, ministers, journalists, teachers, college professors, engineers and social workers – and from their spouses. And, while this movement received support from rural Americans, from the immigrant working class, and from the top leaders in business and finance, the Progressive ethos was rooted in Protestantism. As to where they focused theirattention, many Progressives argued for, and indeed achieved, significant political changes at the local,state and national levels that increased popular control of government. These changes include direct primaries, the elimination of boss rule, the direct election of Senators, the first regulations on campaignfinances, the adoption of the referendum, initiative and recall in many state legislatures, prohibition of the sale and production of liquor, and women’s suffrage. Progressivism also produced three presidents – Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson – whose achievements comprise what some consider to be this movement’s most important legacy. In what did the Progressives believe? Some historians have argued that the Progressives’ context was political only on its surface – that at itscore it was religious, an attempt by Americans from 2 all social classes, but chiefly the middle class, torestore the proper balance among Protestant moral values, capitalistic competition, and democratic processes, which the expansion of business in the Gilded Age seems to have changed in alarming 

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Term
Spring
Professor
buzzanco
Tags
History, Trade union, Open Door Policy

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