GELEC SIS II.docx - SAINT JOSEPH COLLEGE of SINDANGAN...

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SAINT JOSEPH COLLEGE of SINDANGAN INCORPORATEDSindangan, Zamboanga del Norte, PhilippinesTelefax No. (065) 224-2710/ +639121561506COLLEGE DEPARTMENTPsychological with GAD and HIVName:_____________________________________Score:_________Date:_________________________Set A1. What is HIV?
2. The origin and history of HIVOrigin and Hx HIV: It is generally accepted that when HIV crossed species from chimpanzees tohumans, HIV emerged in Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of Congo around 1920. We don'tknow how many people were infected with HIV or developed AIDS up until the 1980s. HIV wasunknown and no obvious signs or symptoms followed transmission.Although occasional cases of AIDS were identified prior to 1970, available data indicate that inthe mid to late 1970s the current epidemic began. HIV may have already spread to five continents by1980, (North America, South America, Europe, Africa and Australia). Between 100,000 and 300,000individuals may have been infected in this time.The same scientists then conducted more researchinto how SIV could have developed in the chimps. They discovered that the chimps had hunted andeaten two smaller species of monkeys (red-capped mangabeys and greater spot-nosed monkeys).These smaller monkeys infected the chimps with two different strains of SIV.The two different SIVstrains then joined together to form a third virus (SIVcpz) that could be passed on to other chimps.This is the strain that can also infect humans.The most commonly accepted theory is that of the'hunter'. In this scenario, SIVcpz was transferred to humans as a result of chimps being killed andeaten, or their blood getting into cuts or wounds on people in the course of hunting.5 Normally, thehunter's body would have fought off SIV, but on a few occasions the virus adapted itself within itsnew human host and became HIV-1.There are four main groups of HIV strains (M, N, O and P), eachwith a slightly different genetic make-up. This supports the hunter theory because every time SIVpassed from a chimpanzee to a human, it would have developed in a slightly different way within thehuman body, and produced a slightly different strain. This explains why there is more than one strainof HIV-1.6 SIVcpz likely jumped to humans when hunters in Africa ate infected chimps, or the chimps’infected blood got into the cuts or wounds of hunters. Researchers believe the first transmission ofSIV to HIV in humans that then led to the global pandemic occurred in 1920 in Kinshasa, the capitaland largest city in the Democratic Republic of Congo.The virus spread may have spread from Kinshasaalong infrastructure routes (roads, railways, and rivers) via migrants and the sex trade.
3. The responses of HIV campaign in our country
4. Differentiate HIV to AIDS
5. Explain the person having HIV/AIDS
Flu-like symptoms can include:

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Term
Spring
Professor
Victoria Canoneo
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