public speaking final

public speaking final - December 11, 2007 Final Speech...

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December 11, 2007 Final Speech Public Speaking I. Introduction A. Imagine one day you get up, climb out of bed and head to class. You listen to a few presentations and finally you are up. Your final speech in public speaking is due, and it is time for you to get up in front of everyone and present your speech. You have been practicing this speech for a while but you are afraid of getting up in front of all these people, just like I am your palms are sweating and you are nervous just like I am and you begin to wonder why do I even need to do this? What is the point? And other than the twenty five percent of my grade that is on the line that is exactly what I am thinking too. Quote: “According to The Book of Lists by David Wallechinsky, the fear of public speaking ranks number one in the minds of the majority of people. Far above the fear of death and disease, comes the fear of standing in front of a crowd.” Received on December 4 th 2007 from http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/fearspk1.html Quote: “Jerry Seinfeld once said that at a funeral, most people would rather in be in the casket than giving the eulogy.” Received on December 4, 2007 from http://www.changethatsrightnow.com/fear-of-public-speaking.asp B. This speech will explain why public speaking is so nerve racking, how you can avoid the intense fear associated with public speaking, and why public speaking is so important to all of us. II. Body A. Why is public speaking so nerve racking? 1. The root cause of the fear of public speaking varies from individual to individual, and while no two individuals are the same, most fall into one of the following categories: a. A Single Traumatic Incident. A highly stressful or frightening real event at which, instantaneously Fear Of Public Speaking is created. Similar to, say, a child being bitten by a dog and developing an immediate phobia, a single traumatic incident is a one-time experience at which there is such extreme fear - even if only for a moment - that the nervous system 'learns' to associate fear to help the individual avoid such situations in the future. The initial fear, by the way, may nothing
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course COMM 27 taught by Professor Schamber during the Fall '07 term at Pacific.

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public speaking final - December 11, 2007 Final Speech...

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