Course Hero Logo

The Cold War (study drive).docx - 2.1 Task 3: The Cold War...

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 12 pages.

2.1Task 3: The Cold War – Two perspectives11.What were the roles of the different paradigms in the Cold War?2.What was the geo-political situation at the time?3.What was Russia’s perspective?4.What was the US’s perspective?5.How did they influence the population?6.What were their respective strategies?Westad (2000), Three Possible Paradigms on the Cold WarIn this article I will try to show how some people within our field are attempting to meetsuch queries by reconceptualizing the Cold War as part of contemporary internationalhistory.Places the emphasis on issues connecting the Cold War – defined as apolitical conflictbetween two power blocs– and someareas of investigationthat hold much promise forreformulating our views of that conflict (the three paradigms):1.Ideology2.Technology3.The Third WorldParadigm(in the history of science): a comprehensive explanation, a kind of scientific “level”that sustains existing theory until overtaken by a new and different paradigm.But,paradigmin the history of human societies: patterns of interpretation, which maypossibly exist side by side, but which each signify a particular approach (an angle of view) tothe complex problems of Cold War history.Many approaches exist to looking at the Cold War: U.S. political history, as history of theSoviet Union, as history of Third World revolutions, as history of European integration, ashistory of gender relations, as history of economic globalization, and more.IdeologyIdeology:a set of fundamental concepts systematically expressed by a large group ofindividuals.The introduction of ideology as a part of our understanding of motives and broad patterns ofaction helps us overcome two of the main problems that international historians of the ColdWar often face:One is that we are seen to be better at explaining single events than we are atanalyzing causes and consequences of larger historical shiftsWe are often seen as using a narrow concept of causality, mostly connected tointerests or state policies

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 12 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
Renier

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture