lecture_6_&_7_-_pr_&_stv_and_sntv_2.4.08

lecture_6_&_7_-_pr_&_stv_and_sntv_2.4.08 - Questions? Grade...

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1 Questions? Grade Breakdown Midterm (25%) Paper (25%) Final (31%) Long class today Additional office hours Thursday: 2-4pm
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2 Midterm 1 week from now All material up to the midterm Material for next time REALLY important for midterm Not easy, but doable Know the workings of the rules well But also be prepared to use the rules creatively Study guide online after class Can go over any questions in remaining time next time
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3 Proportional Representation (PR) What’s the intuition? % of votes will closely match % of seats
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4 Types of Allocation Rules What’s that mean? How you translate votes into seats 2 main approaches in PR Quota and Largest Remainders Divisors
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5 Quota and Largest Remainders (LR) Simple quota and largest remainders (Hare) What does quota and largest remainders mean? In this case (Hare): Quota = V/M or =100/M Other cases: add #s (n) to M to determine quota Droop quota: (V/(M+1))+1 Hare is really proportional system Example
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6 Divisors How’s this work? “Highest average” a = v/(s+n) Most well known type is d’Hondt rule a = v/(s+1) Example
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7 Thresholds What are thresholds of representation? How can these make a difference? How affects LSq and Ns? Examples Israel (previously 1% - now 2%) What is effect? Turkey (10%) What is effect? 2002 Top party (34% of vote), #2 (20%) – Top party (66% of seats), #2 (34% of seats) – No one else represented
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8 PR Districts In some cases PR is national list In some cases, multiple blocs What is likely effect of multiple blocs? Higher LSq Why? Lower M higher LSq
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9 Japan PR Blocs Example
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10 Common Types of PR Closed-List PR Open-List PR
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Closed-List PR What determines how many seats each party gets? Who do you cast your ballot for?
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course POL 140A taught by Professor Scheiner during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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lecture_6_&_7_-_pr_&_stv_and_sntv_2.4.08 - Questions? Grade...

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