class01 - American Political Parties"Modern democracy...

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Unformatted text preview: American Political Parties "Modern democracy is unthinkable save in terms of parties." E.E. Schattschneider March 28, 2007 Today Overview of American parties Overview of the course Today Overview of American parties Overview of the course Individuals Voters Non-voters Governments Federal State Local Legislatures Executives Courts Public Policies Individuals Voters Non-voters Governments Federal State Local Legislatures Executives Courts Political parties are the glue that holds all of this together! Public Policies Parties ... Generate symbols of identification and loyalty Aggregate and articulate political interests Mobilize majorities in the electorate and government Socialize voters and maintain a popular following Organize dissent and opposition Recruit political leadership and seek government office Institutionalize, channel, and socialize conflict Override the dangers of sectionalism and promote the national interest Implement policy objectives Legitimize the decisions of government Foster stability in government Parties Are ... A party is a group organized to nominate candidates, to try to win political power through elections, and to promote ideas about public policies. Parties Are ... A party is a group organized to nominate candidates, to try to win political power through elections, and to promote ideas about public policies. Parties Are ... A party is a group organized to nominate candidates, to try to win political power through elections, and to promote ideas about public policies. Parties Are ... A party is a group organized to nominate candidates, to try to win political power through elections, and to promote ideas about public policies. Three Elements Party in Government (PIG) Candidates for public office and those who hold office, elected or appointed, who share a party label. Individuals who feel some loyalty to and identify with a party. Party committees, their leaders, and activists who work for party causes and candidates. Party in the Electorate (PIE) Party as Organization (PAO) Mutually Reenforcing PAO PIG PIE Mutually Reenforcing PAO PIG PIE American Parties Are ... Loosely coupled The connections between party elements are neither explicit nor binding. State and local parties exert significant influence on party activity in and out of government. Informal party organizations play an important role. Federal, state, and local laws severely constrain party organization and operation. Relatively decentralized Highly regulated Why not Interest Groups? Why are these parties ... while these are not? Libertarian Party AARP Green Party National Rifle Association Peace and Freedom United Auto Workers Party Natural Law Party Sierra Club American Club for Growth Independent Party Key Differences Parties are paramount in elections. Parties have a full-time commitment to political activity. Parties mobilize large numbers. Parties endure. Parties serve as political symbols. Today Overview of American parties Overview of the course Course Overview Part I: A little history & theory Why parties? Evolving views of parties in the U.S. Why just two parties? Part II: Parties as Organizations State and national parties Parties and nominations Informal party organizations Third parties and independent candidates (Guest lecture) Course Overview Part III: Parties in the Electorate Party ID Party systems/realignments Polarization? Voting Part IV: Parties in Government Congressional parties Divided government Course Requirements Component Four short papers (3-5 pp.) Five pop quizzes Midterm (5/2) Final (6/13 @ 4 PM) Section participation Weight 20% 20% 25% 30% 5% Note: All written work must be submitted in order to receive a passing grade in this course. Contact Info Prof. Keith Smith Office: 133 SSH (the Death Star) Hours: Mon. & Wed. 10 AM - 12 PM & by appointment Email: [email protected] TA Marco Vega Office: 136 SSH Hours: Thurs. 2:30 - 3:30 PM & by appointment Email: [email protected] ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course POL 160 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '07 term at UC Davis.

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