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11-12 Theatre and the Diaspora-part II Latino Theatre

11-12 Theatre and the Diaspora-part II Latino Theatre -...

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Theatre and the Diaspora: Part II Latino Theatre 5 ELEMENTS DEFINING LATINO THEATRE (for this class) - Ancestry is traced to Spanish speaking countries of the Americas - Playwrights have lived in the US for a significant amount of time - Plays are affected by the sounds, images, and experiences of life in the US
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Plays include a sense of bothPlays will not be entirely written in just one language Very Important: Many plays contain issues pertaining to: 1. Identity formation 2. Apropriation 3. determination Farm-workers theater About racial violence in LA Amazing playwright Interation of women Relationship between men and women in communities Most famous Chicano playwright - big with education Short agitprop pieces dramatizing the lives of workers Agitprop (n.) agitation propaganda “The Sellouts” most popular and influencial. Satirical portrait of Chicano sellouts. Contributing to stereotypes created by Anglo-Americans (North American of English heritage) The switching between languages. Only develops through high-level of proficiency in both languages. Using signs (signage) around necks Good tool for being political. Used as more feminine model than Cuban-American model because she isn’t always concerned with the Cuban-American experience. To Cuba lobbying for release of Cuban prisoners
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Stigma of sexualization and oppresion. Only the 2 nd play to win a Pulitzer Prize before staged Broadway shows? Story of a dayroom People waiting Ox cart Street theater is the only way to produce free theater Ox Cart and PRTT pushed it - English and Spanish
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Plays contain characteristicsPlays will not be entirely written in just one language Very Important: Many plays contain issues pertaining to: 4. Identity formation 5. Apropriation 6. determination Farm-workers theater About racial violence in LA Amazing playwright Interation of women Relationship between men and women in communities Most famous Chicano playwright - big with education Short agitprop pieces dramatizing the lives of workers Agitprop (n.) agitation propaganda “The Sellouts” most popular and influencial. Satirical portrait of Chicano sellouts. Contributing to stereotypes created by Anglo-Americans (North American of English heritage) The switching between languages. Only develops through high-level of proficiency in both languages. Using signs (signage) around necks Good tool for being political. Used as more feminine model than Cuban-American model because she isn’t always concerned with the Cuban-American experience. To Cuba lobbying for release of Cuban prisoners
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Stigma of sexualization and oppresion. Only the 2 nd play to win a Pulitzer Prize before staged Broadway shows? Story of a dayroom People waiting Ox cart Street theater is the only way to produce free theater Ox Cart and PRTT pushed it - that are unique to the Latino experience ORIGINS OF THE TERM LATINO - Used as early as 1929 - No connection to spain, but to its Latin American colonies - Two reasons for its widespread use: o Emphasizes the Latin marican history of colonialism o
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