BIOL202 - Study Guide - Lecture 7 - Trophic Interactions II

BIOL202 - Study Guide - Lecture 7 - Trophic Interactions II...

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LECTURE 7: STUDY GUIDE SHORT-TERM TROPHIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SPECIES II: EFFECT ON PREY POPULATIONS Reading: no new reading Questions : 1. Be familiar with Errington’s “Doomed Surplus” hypothesis and the logic behind it. Don’t just try to memorize what appears on the overheads, rather try to understand the idea thoroughly and be able to describe it in your own words, perhaps with hypothetical examples. To help guide you in your learning, consider the following questions: a) Early in the last century, it was widely believed among members of the general public and among most wildlife managers, ecologists, etc., that because predators kill and remove prey individuals from the environment, predators MUST hold the abundance of prey species down below the prey’s environmental carrying capacity. Was Errington supporting or arguing against this bit of conventional wisdom? b) According to Errington how and why (i.e., under what circumstances) might a predator not hold a prey population’s size down below carrying capacity? How could this be possible? c) Errington argues that in some situations, predators are likely just to be taking part of the “doomed surplus” in the prey population? What specifically is the “doomed surplus”? Why is there a “doomed surplus”? (see esp. the modified overhead that was emailed) 2. In the mid-20 th century, many people raced out to test Errington’s Doomed Surplus hypothesis. Often, they would do the following:
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BIOL202 - Study Guide - Lecture 7 - Trophic Interactions II...

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