BIOL202 - Study Guide - Lecture 3 - Reading - Density dependence in Bald Eagles

BIOL202 Study - So Many Bald Eagles So Little Room Left to Nest By D'Vera Cohn Washington Post Staff Writer Monday A06 The dramatic aerial battle

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So Many Bald Eagles, So Little Room Left to Nest By D'Vera Cohn Washington Post Staff Writer Monday, April 17, 2006; A06 The dramatic aerial battle this month between two bald eagles contending for territory on the Potomac River south of Washington is a sign that their population rebound has been so successful they are running out of habitat. The number of breeding pairs of eagles in the Chesapeake Bay region grew from fewer than 100 in the late 1970s to about 1,000 this year. Eagles are crowding together more closely, and a growing number of birds are being treated for injuries suffered in turf battles. The nonprofit Wildlife Center of Virginia in Waynesboro treated six eagles last year that had wounds consistent with fights with other eagles, compared with two the year before, said its president, Ed Clark. At Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research in Newark, Del., another nonprofit facility, the bald eagle injured near Washington was the fifth one brought in this year from Maryland with fight injuries. "All of this relates to the fact that the population is reaching some level of capacity at this point," said Bryan D. Watts, director of the Center for Conservation Biology at the College of William and Mary. "The bay population has increased tenfold in the last 30 years. It doesn't take that many years to go to saturation. The bay has produced more chicks in the past five years than it has in the previous 25. "The population is still growing but beginning to level off," he said. "We've been expecting these kinds of encounters to start." Watts co-wrote a paper last year that analyzed eagle population growth in the tidal reach of the Chesapeake Bay and predicted it would reach saturation within a decade. As the human population grows, the acreage of waterfront habitat for eagles probably
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This test prep was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course BIOL 201 taught by Professor Mechling during the Spring '07 term at Towson.

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BIOL202 Study - So Many Bald Eagles So Little Room Left to Nest By D'Vera Cohn Washington Post Staff Writer Monday A06 The dramatic aerial battle

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