Lecture3_Legacy of colonization Latin America-1

Lecture3_Legacy of colonization Latin America-1 - Legacy of...

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Legacy of Colonization in Latin America Lecture 3 Geog 130
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Announcement • Please check Blackboard for your class activities: Elms.umd.edu • Bring your books to discussion
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Definition of Terms Colonialism/colonization: establishment, maintenance, and domination over a nation and its people. Thus, creating a political and economic domination and dependency between the dominant and the dependent. Imperialism: the process of establishing economic and trading domination over another nation. Neocolonialism : is the process by rich, powerful, developed state use economic, political, or other informal means to exert pressure on poor, less powerful, underdeveloped states.
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Spanish Empire in the Americas http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1148.html When and where the first viceroyalties and cities established?
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Treaty of Tordesillas-1494 http://www.harpercollege.edu/mhealy/geogres/maps/smgif/smtorde.gif Why is it so important?
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The Columbian Exchange •P l a n t s •A n i m a l s •D i s e a s e s • Demographic • Mineral Wealth • Trade Items • Technology • Language • Religion • Economy • Government • Urban Planning • “The Columbian Exchange” is the sharing of cultures that transformed the lives of two continents. • Its was a two-way process with people, goods, and ideas moving back and forth. •T h e four G’s • What was exchanged?
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Plants Americas • Maize •P o t a t o • Tomato • Tobacco • Beans • Cacao • Cotton Europe •S u g a r •R i c e • Wheat •C o f f e e • Banana •G r a p e s
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Origin of Plants and Livestock Source: Bergman and Renwick, 2003
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Plants So what? • Asian and African plants were introduced such as bananas, plantains, sugarcane, and rice. • Crops were introduced to a new environment to which they were better suited and to a location that could easily be transported . • The Portuguese made it a policy to introduce plants from one part to another in their empire. Bananas to Brazil and maize, manioc, and peanuts to Africa. • These crops became important global commodities . • Diffusion of plants throughout the world.
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Animals Americas • Turkey Europe • Cattle •Ho r se
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Animals • Introduction of Animals from Europe had a big impact on land use, economies and lifestyles. • L.A. had no large domesticated animals • except for llamas. • The imported animals became the center of the Latin America livestock industry . • Environmental impact .
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Animals
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Diseases Americas •New s t ra in s of syphilis
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Diseases • “The greatest genocide in human history.” • Central Mexico: – Indigenous population decline from 25 million to less than one million with a century. Around Mexico and Central America population decline by as much as 90 percent. • Caribbean:
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course GEOG 130 taught by Professor Luna during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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Lecture3_Legacy of colonization Latin America-1 - Legacy of...

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