Chapters 7 and 8

Chapters 7 and 8 - Midterm 3: Chapters 7 and 8 1. Primate...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Midterm 3: Chapters 7 and 8 1. Primate Behavior a. Behavior-- product of interactions between genetic and environmental factors and shaped by the evolutionary process i. Behavioral ecology— study of interactions between genetic and environmental factors as agents of natural selection (are some traits favored?) ii. Plasticity— the capacity to change and adapt iii. In humans 1. most behavior is learned 2. behavior is effected by genetics (like hormones) b. Modes of Locomotion c. Dental Formula d. Social Living—influenced by food, habitat, and potential predators, only when benefits outweigh the costs i. Food 1. primates rely heavily on one type of diet (Specializations) 2. body size (related to energy and nutrient content): insectivores < frugivores < folivores ii. Habitat 1. Territory 2. Ranging Behavior 3. Core Areas 4. Species reliant on foods in small clumps tend to be protective iii. Predation 1. Small bodied species have more predators 2. Small tend to hide (passive) 3. large tend to monitor and mount counterattacks (active) iv. Costs for sociality: increased competition for everything 1. Costly especially for those who rely on small dispersed food items (bugs) 2. Costly especially for those who rely on passive (hiding) rather than active anti-predator strategies 3. v. Benefits for Sociality 1. Antipredator: a. dilution (less chance of it being you) b. detection (early warning signs) c. deterrence (swarm together) 2. Feeding Benefits (ex: good for frugivores, bad for insectivores) a. find scattered resource clumps b. defend resource clumps c. cooperative hunting 3. Benefit those who a. rely on food that occurs in clumps large enough to share b. rely on active predator strategies
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
e. Sex and Reproduction i. k-selected— individuals produce relatively few offspring, but invest increased parental care ii. r-selected— large numbers of offspring, reduced parental care iii. Sexual Selection: favors traits that increase competitiveness for mates, operates on the sex that has to compete 1. Intersexual—traits that attract members of the opposite sex (ex peacocks)
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 6

Chapters 7 and 8 - Midterm 3: Chapters 7 and 8 1. Primate...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online