Chapter 5 Notes

Chapter 5 Notes - Chapter 5 Information Gathering:...

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1 Chapter 5 Information Gathering: Unobtrusive Methods Systems Analysis and Design 2 Learning Objectives ± Recognize the value of unobtrusive methods for information gathering ± Understand the concept of sampling for human information requirements analysis ± Construct useful samples of people, documents, and events for determining human information requirements ± Create an analyst’s playscript to observe decision-maker activities ± Apply the STROBE technique to observe and interpret the decision-maker’s environment and their interaction with technologies
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2 3 Unobtrusive Methods ± Less disruptive ± Insufficient when used alone ± Multiple methods approach ± Used in conjunction with interactive methods 4 Major Topics ± Sampling ± Quantitative document analysis ± Qualitative document analysis ± Observation ± STROBE
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3 5 Sampling ± Sampling is a process of systematically selecting representative elements of a population. ± Involves two key decisions: ± Which of the key documents and Web sites should be sampled. ± Which people should be interviewed or sent questionnaires. 6 Advantages of Sampling The reasons systems analysts do sampling are: ± Reduces costs ± Speeds up the data gathering ± less interviews and less reading is done. ± Improves effectiveness by gathering a greater amount of data from a smaller amount of sources ± Reduces data-gathering bias. ± For example, interview an executive v/s sampling
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4 7 Sampling Design Steps To design a good sample, a systems analyst needs to follow four steps: ± Determining the data to be collected or described. ± Identifying the variables, attributes and data items that need to be gathered as well as considering the study objectives and the type of data gathering method to be used. ± Determining the population to be sampled. ± For example, for written information, how far back chronologically should the analyst go? ± If interviews, how many employees from each organizational level should be interviewed? What about other stakeholders? ± Choosing the type of sample. ± Deciding on the sample size. 8 Types of Sampling
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5 9 Convenience Sampling ± Unrestricted, nonprobability samples. ± Anyone can participate in if they're interested. ± Easy to arrange ± Most unreliable since these are the people who are motivated to participate 10 Purposive Sampling ± Based on judgment ± Analyst chooses group of individuals to sample ± Based on criteria ± Analyst chooses people to interview based on who he/she thinks is motivated and knowledgeable ± Nonprobability sample ± not random, and therefore not scientific ± Moderately reliable
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6 11 Simple Random Sampling ± Based on a numbered list of the population ± Each person or document has an equal chance of being selected ± Numbers can be drawn to see who is asked. 12
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course CSIS 2210 taught by Professor Aakash during the Spring '08 term at Stockton.

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Chapter 5 Notes - Chapter 5 Information Gathering:...

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