Chapter 6 Notes

Chapter 6 Notes - 1 Chapter 6 Prototyping, RAD, and Extreme...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Chapter 6 Prototyping, RAD, and Extreme Programming Systems Analysis and Design Kendall & Kendall Sixth Edition 2 Learning Objectives Prototyping for human information requirements gathering Understand the concept of RAD for use in human information requirements gathering and interface design Understand agile modeling and the core practices that differentiate it from other development methodologies Learn the importance of values critical to agile modeling Understand how to improve efficiency for users who are knowledge workers using either structured methods or agile modeling 2 3 Major Topics Prototyping Rapid application development (RAD) Agile Modeling 4 Prototyping An information-gathering technique. Repetitive process Rudimentary version of system is built Prototypes are useful in seeking user reactions, suggestions, innovations, and revision plans. Prototyping may be used as an alternative to the systems development life cycle. Most useful when: User requests are not clear Few users are involved in the system Designs are complex and require concrete form to evaluate fully Goal: to develop concrete specifications for ultimate system 3 5 Prototyping Four Types of Prototypes: Patched-up Nonoperational First-of-a-series Selected features 6 Types of Prototype Patched-Up Prototype A system that works but is patched up or patched together A working model that has all the necessary features but is inefficient For example: Users can interact with the system Retrieval and storage of information may be inefficient Nonoperational Prototype Also known as Nonworking scale model Tests certain aspects of the design Useful idea of the system can be gained through prototyping of the input and output only. Coding required by the application is too expensive to prototype Not operational, except for certain features to be tested 4 7 Types of Prototype First-of-a-Series Prototype A first full-scale model of a system Completely operational Useful when many installations of the same information system are planned A full-scale prototype is installed in one or two locations first, and if successful, duplicates are installed at all locations based on customer usage patterns and other key factors Selected Features Prototype Building an operational model that includes some, but not all, of the features that the final system will have Includes some, but not all, essential features are included Built in modules Part of the actual system 8 Four kinds of prototypes 5 9 Prototyping as an Alternative Problems with the SDLC Extended time required to go through the development life cycle User requirements change over time Prototyping may be used as an alternative??....
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Chapter 6 Notes - 1 Chapter 6 Prototyping, RAD, and Extreme...

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