platoslaws

platoslaws - THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE REPUBLIC AND THE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE REPUBLIC AND THE LAWS   The reader of the  Republic  who picks up the  Laws  is likely to have difficulty in believing  that the same person wrote both. The obvious explanation of the apparent vast  difference of approach between the two works is that as Plato grew older and wiser his  optimism turned to pessimism, and his idealism into realism; and that in the  Statesman  we can see in him the act of changing horses. What makes this explanation so  irresistible is of course the way in which the alleged doctrinal development matches the  chronological sequence of the dialogues concerned: we feel in our bones that realism  must come later than idealism. But this charmingly simple account of the development of  Plato's political theory really will not do, because it confuses  attainable  ideals with  unattainable  ideals. Only if we take the  Republic  as an attainable ideal does it make  sense to argue that Plato abandoned it in favour of something more realistic; but to  suppose that Plato ever thought that the  Republic  was attainable would be to suppose  him capable not merely of optimism or idealism but of sheer political naïveté. It makes  much better sense to think of the  Republic  as an extreme statement, designed to shock,  of the consequences of an uncompromising application of certain political principles - in  fact, as an  un attainable ideal - and to suppose that even when Plato wrote the  Republic he had some realistic practical programme, which may well have been more or less what  we find in the Laws.24 (I grant, however, that Plato's advancing years and political  1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
disappointments probably stimulated him to commit his political programme to writing for  the benefit of his successors.) In short, Plato could perfectly well have written the  Laws  when he wrote the  Republic  and the  Republic  when he wrote the  Laws , for they are the  opposite sides of the same coin. The  Republic  presents merely the  theoretical  ideal, and  - a point which is often ignored - explicitly and emphatically allows for some diminution in  rigour if it were to be put into practice.25 The  Laws  describes, in effect, the  Republic  modified and realized in the conditions of this world. It is therefore both true and not true  to say, as H. D. P. Lee does,26 that 'those who have read the  Republic  have read all the  essential things Plato has to say on the subject' (politics). It is true that he will have read  the basic principles, but he will not have read the methods by which Plato, if he had had 
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

platoslaws - THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE REPUBLIC AND THE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online