BMB410Essay#1 - BMB 410 Sally Dixon-Molloy Sulfur Oxidizing...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BMB 410 Sally Dixon-Molloy Sulfur Oxidizing Bacteria The microbe Thiomargarita namibiensis is a unique sulfur oxidizing bacteria. This bacterium has only been found in two habitats on the entire planet. The first and foremost is the shelf sediments off the coast of Namibia and it has been found in a small section of the Gulf of Mexico. The relationship between these two places is the prevalence of diatoms which is a type of algae. This is relevant because dead diatoms provide carbon to the T. namibiensis as well as sulfide in the sediment. These bacteria are unique in that they are the largest bacteria known. This is due to a large nitrate containing vacuole that takes up 80% of the cell size. This vacuole is vital to the microbe’s survival since it isn’t motile and relies on the storage of nitrate to be the electron acceptor in its electron transport chain. The bacterium lives in a sediment rich in hydrogen sulfide which it oxidizes. However, the sediment is lacking the nitrate needed. This problem is solved
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This essay was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course BMB 410 taught by Professor Dixon-molloy during the Spring '08 term at University of Maine Orono .

Page1 / 3

BMB410Essay#1 - BMB 410 Sally Dixon-Molloy Sulfur Oxidizing...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online