Lab Manual - Engineering 202 Laboratory Manual Statics And...

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Unformatted text preview: Engineering 202 Laboratory Manual Statics And Strength of Materials ( Read before attending lab .) Fall 2007 , Spring 2008 This manual has evolved over the years. Contributors in the past two decades include: Kenneth Bhalla, Jason Cortell, Drew Eisenberg, Jill Evensizer, Richard Lance, Jamie Manos, Dan Mittler, Francis Moon, Leigh Phoenix, James Rice, Andy Ruina, and Alan Zehnder. Revised August 2005 Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics Cornell University Ithaca, New York TAM 202 LAB MANUAL Introduction 1 THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS 202 STATICS AND STRENGTH OF MATERIALS Revised: August 2005 INTRODUCTION PURPOSE These laboratories are designed to complement the lectures, text, and homework. They should help you gain a physical feel for some of the basic concepts in statics and strengths of solids: force, stress, deflection, strain, yield, failure and buckling. You will also get exposure to equipment which you may use in the future. Some mathematics from MATH 192 and 293 will be used, helping you make the tie between mathematics and physical reality that is essential to most engineering. The labs may come either before or after you cover the relevant material in lecture. Thus, they can be either a motivation for the lecture material or an application of what you have learned, depending on the timing. Lab groups are small enough (2 or 3 people) that you can get direct experience with the instruments and equipment. Both you and your lab partners should learn how to do all aspects of the lab. The laboratory teaching assistants will have scheduled office hours in the laboratories so that you can return to use the facilities independently or ask questions. These hours will be posted on the door of the laboratory. You may also ask the lab TA about other course material if time allows. CONTENT There are four labs and one assignment which require write-ups: 0) Error Analysis (handed in with the Lab 1 report) 1) Truss 2) Tension Test 3) Beam 4) Compression It is essential that you read through the lab (especially the procedure section) and answer the pre-lab questions before coming to lab. The reading for Lab 1 is quite long and may look a bit intimidating, but the rest are short. In addition to the regular labs, there are some demonstrations set up for you to experiment with, if enough time is available. Some of the labs may also include extra topics for you to research, or ask you to develop a small experiment of your own. LOCATION The laboratory is in Thurston 101A, it the first doors on your right when entering Thurston Hall. 2 Introduction TAM 202 LAB MANUAL SCHEDULING Each of the four labs is taught for three weeks. You will be scheduled to attend lab during one week of the three. The meeting dates for your laboratory section will be posted online on the course website. In general, you will have a lab once every three weeks, but be aware that this may vary due to exam and break schedules. (Summer session lab schedules will differ.) See the Secretary in Kimball 212 if you have schedules....
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2008 for the course ENGRD 2020 taught by Professor Zehnder during the Spring '06 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lab Manual - Engineering 202 Laboratory Manual Statics And...

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