Book report ps 107

Book report ps 107 - Joseph Hogeboon Sexing the Brain...

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Joseph Hogeboon Sexing the Brain Lesley Rogers
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In Chapter 1, New Methods, Old ideas, Rogers first clarifies some terms that will be used to refer to the difference between men and women. She first asks us, should we use the term “sex differences” or “gender differences”. She then goes into detail that usually feminist writers have a strong preference for using “gender” instead of “sex” because this emphasizes the importance of cultural influences on the development of femininity and masculinity. Some old ideas that Rogers has talked about in this first chapter is that in the nineteenth century, it was asserted that the frontal lobes were on average smaller in men than in women but that the parietal lobes were on average larger in men than in women. New methods that Rogers summarizes is that now-a- days groups describe themselves as being “biologically” superior to another to justify holding power or most of the resources in a society. Biological difference is rarely seen as being value free. As in the research on comparing the fine structural aspects of the brains of heterosexuals and homosexuals, this has social implications. My reaction to this chapter is that for the most part I agree with what Lesley Rogers talks about with the terms “sex differences” or “gender differences”. I see now that more females, instead of saying the word “sex” they are saying “gender” and I agree with how Rogers tells us why this is. Secondly, I remember back in the 8 th grade, in science class, how men were always smarter because their parietal lobes were bigger and women were not as smart. I believe that this is true to an extent because men I believe are more intelligent in spatial and mathematics while women are smarter in the vocational aspect and nurturing part of the brain. The last thing that I see and I believe is true is that with heterosexuals and homosexuals there is a social implication. I see that heterosexual’s believe they are considered by a large part of society far more superior to homosexuals and transsexuals, and biological differences are used to justify this position. These are my reactions to the first chapter in this book.
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In the second chapter, what causes sex differences, Rogers explains how boys and girls are almost raised differently the moment they are born. She believes that biologists studying sex differences ignore effects of social experience on biology, or at least underplay them. Rogers then tells us that from the moment a child is born, it is assigned to the male or the female sex and, in almost all cultures, is then treated either as a girl or as a boy. However, Rogers believes
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Book report ps 107 - Joseph Hogeboon Sexing the Brain...

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