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fishing.docx - 1. According to research on fishing...

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1.According to research on fishing activities, the demise of the British fishing sector began longbefore any European fishing strategy was established. In reality, its ultimate beginnings may betraced back to a surprise source: the late-nineteenth-century growth of railways.Trawling hadbeen practiced for more than 500 years using sail power. However, without refrigeration, fishcould only be supplied to locations near the ports for sale. Fish could now be delivered inland tolarge towns and cities thanks to the arrival of the rail network.The French boats outnumbered the British boats by about eight to one. Collisions eruptedquickly, and projectiles were launched. The British were forced to flee and returned to port withshattered windows but no injuries.Under the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) of the EuropeanUnion, British fishermen had the legal right to fish in these waters, as well as all boats from EUmember states1. The complex problem stems from a French ordinance that banned local boatsfrom fishing in these areas and recovering resources from annual harvests from May 16th toSeptember 30th each year. was doing. However, under the CFP, EU member states do not havethe authority to prevent the fleets of other member states from fishing in their waters.From the1880s forward, steam trawlers began to replace sail trawlers in order to fulfil the expandingdemand. The increasing power of these steam vessels considerably expanded the scope oftrawling, allowing them to trawl for longer periods of time and farther from port while pullinglarger nets. Fishing grounds expanded to locations as far away as Greenland, north Norway, andthe Barents Sea, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands as British steam trawlers travelled further awayfrom Britain in search of fish.To compensate, the fleet's size and power continued to grow asmore effort was required to collect increasingly limited fish. As the fleet continued to exert moreand more effort to maintain the magnitude of catches, the amount of fish landed per unit ofpower fell at a quicker rate than fish landings beginning in the late 1950s. This attempt, however,was largely fruitless, and by 1980, catches had plummeted to their lowest level in a century2.Between 2002 and 2006, there was a scandal known as "The Black Fish Scandal.3"The actiontook place in the north-east of Scotland, specifically at the fishing ports of Peterhead and1 Agnew. D. J., Pearce, J., Pramod G., Peatman, T., Watson, R., Beddington, J. R., Pitcher T. J., (2009). “Estimating theWorldwide Extent of Illegal Fishing”, PLoS ONE 4(2)2 Atta-Mills, J., Alder, J., Sumaila, U. R., (2004). “The decline of a regional fishing nation: The case of Ghana andWest Africa”, Natural Resources Forum, 28(1), 13-213 Smith, R. (2015), "Documenting the UK “Black Fish Scandal” as a case study of criminal entrepreneurship",International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 35 No. 3/4, pp. 199-221. -2014-0018

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Term
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Tags
United Nations, International Monetary Fund, International Taxation, Tax treaty, United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime

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