Final Study Guide

Final Study Guide - Chapter 1 I. Classification of Matter...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 1 I. Classification of Matter a. Matter: anything that occupies space and has mass; things we can see (pen) and can’t see (air) b. 2 principle ways to classify matter: physical state and composition (element, compound or mixture) c. 3 States of Matter: i. Solid : definite volume and shape ii. Liquid : definite volume but no definite shape iii. Gas : no fixed volume or shape II. Properties of Matter a. Chemical : can only be observed when a substance is changed into another substance EX: flammability, corrosiveness, reactivity with acid, combustion b. Physical : can be observed without changing a substance into another EX: boiling point, density, mass, volume III. Properties of Matter a. Extensive : depends on how much matter is being considered EX: mass – relates to amount of substance present b. Intensive : does not depend on how much matter is being considered (not additive) – many can be used to identify substances EX: density QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. IV. Units of Measurement a. Metric System : system of units of measurement in which divisions to subunits are made by the power of 10 QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. b. SI Units
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. c. Temperature conversions i. K = ° C + 273 ii. ° F = 9/5 ( ° C) + 32 iii. ° C = 5/9 ( ° F - 32) V. Density a. density = mass/volume VI. Sig Figs a. 5 Rules i. Nonzero digits are always significant ii. Zeros between nonzeros are always significant iii. Zeros at beginning of number are never significant iv. Zeros at end of a number 1 that has a decimal point are always significant; ex. 1.0 Zeros at end of a number < 1: only zeros at end and in middle are significant v. Zero at end of number that contains no decimal may or may not be significant EX: 400 cm may have 1, 2 or 3 sig figs; use exponential notation to clarify: 4 x 10 2 1 sig fig 4.0 x 10 2 2 sig figs 4.00 x 10 2 3 sig figs b. Sig Figs in Calculations i. Addition and Subtraction Rule: answer has same number of decimal places as term with fewest decimal places ii. Multiplication and Division Rule: answer has same number of sig figs as are in term with fewest sig figs VII. Dimensional Analysis a. Procedure used to convert between units in solving chem problems
Background image of page 2
Chapter 2 I. Structure of an Atom a. Dalton’s theory: atom is the basic unit of an element that can enter into chemical combination QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. b. number of protons = number of neutrons c. an atom has no net electrical charge II. Atomic Number, Mass Number and Isotopes a. Atomic number : number of protons in nucleus b. Mass number : sum of protons and neutrons QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. c.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 27

Final Study Guide - Chapter 1 I. Classification of Matter...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online