Chemistry_Lab_Report - SR.BOND.8A USING PROPERTIES OF...

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SR.BOND.8A USING PROPERTIES OF COMPOUNDS TO DETERMINE BONDING TYPES Chemical compounds can be classified in a variety of ways based on observable properties. Some of these properties can be attributed to the bonding between atoms within the compound, while others are caused by the interactive forces between compounds. By grouping compounds that show similar characteristics, we can appreciate the uniqueness of bonding types. In this activity, you are asked to make specific observations of many substances and then find a way of grouping them based on your observations. OBJECTIVES When you have completed this activity, you will be able to: 1. Perform laboratory tests to determine properties of a series of compounds. 2. Use your observations to arrange the compounds into groups that demonstrate similar properties. 3. Explain the differences in observed properties in terms of interactive forces. MATERIALS safety goggles scoopula test tubes beaker droppers conductivity tester magnifying glass timer or watch para film squares watch glass Samples of the following liquids: deionized water vegetable oil methanol deodorized kerosene Samples of the following solids: MgSO 4 Camphor Cetyl Alcohol Paraffin NaNO 3 CuSO 4 Sucrose FeSO 4 Fructose KBr I 2 Lauric Acid
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SR.BOND.8A PROCEDURE PART I: PROPERTIES OF SOLID COMPOUNDS At each station, you will find one of the solids to be tested. You must test each compound for all properties. When you have completed all of the tests on the solids at the station, you will move to the next station to perform the test on the solids at that station. Your teacher will tell you the number of samples that you must test. A . Odor test/volatility Open the plastic vial of the compound. Using proper “wafting technique,” test the odor of the compound. Enter “yes” if an odor is detected, or “no” if no odor is detected. Enter results in Data Table 1. B. Appearance Place a match head-sized sample of the compound on the watch glass. Look at the sample with and without a magnifying lens. Describe your observations in Data Table 1. C. Melting Point Place a pea-sized sample of the solid on a large watch glass and place the watch glass on top of a beaker that contains boiling water. Note the appearance and the time it takes for the compound to melt. If it has not melted in 4 minutes , record the melting point as “high” ; if it takes less than 4 minutes for the substance to melt enter the melting point as “low” in Data Table 1.
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