The intravascular compartment contains fluid ie blood

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Unformatted text preview: e intravascular compartment contains fluid (i.e., blood) within the cardiac chambers and vascular system of the body. The extravascular system is everything outside of the intravascular compartment. Fluid and electrolytes readily move between these two compartments. The extravascular compartment is made up of many subcompartments such as the cellular, interstitial, and lymphatic subcompartments, and a specialized system containing cerebrospinal fluid. The movement of fluid and accompanying solutes between compartments (mostly water, electrolytes, and smaller molecular weight solutes) is governed by physical factors such as hydrostatic and oncotic forces. These forces are normally balanced in such a manner the fluid volume remains relatively constant between the compartments. If the physical forces or barriers to fluid movement are altered, the volume of fluid may increase in one compartment and decrease in another. In some cases, total fluid volume increases in the body so that both intravascular and extravascular compartments increase in volume. This...
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PHYS 1010 taught by Professor Thompson during the Fall '07 term at New York Medical College.

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