Contemporary Poetry Forms - Epistle aka Epistolary Poem The word epistle may sound religious but it is actually just another term for a letter An

Contemporary Poetry Forms - Epistle aka Epistolary Poem The...

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Epistle aka Epistolary Poem The word “epistle” may sound religious, but it is actually just another term for a letter. An epistolary poem is any poem that takes the form of correspondence. There aren’t any requirements for meter or rhyming schemes, though rhyming couplets are fairly common, and epistles can be as informal as you’d like. They can be directed at a person, a location (for a modern lyrical example, look to LCD Soundsystem’s “New York, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down”), the world at large, even an emotion (“Dear Fury…”). Why you should try it: Because of the personal, intimate nature of letters, writing to one of your characters (from either yourself or from another character), to your setting, or to an object in your story can unleash all sorts of fresh ideas. Entire novels— Dracula for example—have been written as epistles. Besides, when’s the last time you sat down and wrote a letter? Example: " Epistle To Augusta " by Lord Byron Acrostic Poem An acrostic poem is a poem in which the first letter of each line spells a word or phrase, often the subject of the work. Like so: Bound together Old pages smell of dust Objects of adoration Keeping reality at bay Shelves of hidden worlds In the more challenging double-acrostic, the last letters of each line also spell either the same word or the second half of a word or phrase.
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