Title IX - Masich 1 William Masich English Composition 112...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Masich 1 William Masich English Composition 112 Dr. Thomas Dukes 30 March 2015 Title IX: Long Overdue Revision In recent times, sports have always been thought of as a masculine activity, this being the case, there has always been limitations for females in any level of sports. This is seen in middle school athletics all the way to collegiate athletics. That had to change. In June of 1972, the President of the United States signed Title IX. According to justice.gov, Title IX is a federal law that does not allow the discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity. The law basically requires that federally funded education programs ensure gender equity in their activities, which is good. We must provide good opportunity in our educational system that does not exclude anyone because of their sex. These opportunities are heavily involved in athletics. We have the responsibility to make sure women are not overlooked, yet Title IX, designed to ensure gender equity in sports, may be having more of a negative affect on men’s sports than people realize. The argument over how effective Title IX is and whether it should be in place has been quite the argument, ever since the law was put in place. Title IX is a great idea for our educational system; it just needs some major overhauling. Most of the negative affects of the law are felt at the collegiate level by male sports programs. I believe in equal opportunity for females in athletics. However, with male sports being so popular and a much bigger deal at the collegiate level, I do not think female opportunity should come at the expense of opportunity.
Masich 2 A major issue with the law is it requires the number of male and female athletes on teams to be nearly proportional to the number of male and female students at the university. According to Brigid Schulte, this part of the law causes issues for schools which are unprivileged financially. With their inability to add female sports because of lack of funds, they end up cutting men’s sports teams. She also goes on to explain that since 1985, the number of male athletes at each school has dropped six percent and that the number of male sports teams per school dropped seventeen percent. Most surprising to me, she points out that since 1995, the number of female sports teams at each school has exceeded the number of male sports teams. This shows that the law is no longer even doing what it was originally in place to do, create gender equity. At this point there is an imbalance that is leaning away from men’s athletics. With the bill now being almost forty-five years old, it is time for some revision. In 2003, there was an episode of 60 Minutes that aired on CBS about a couple of male athletes that were suing to have the law changed. While women have been making strides in collegiate academics and athletics, elimination of multiple men’s teams goes unnoticed. The majority of sports cut are gymnastics, wrestling, track and field, and swimming. These sports

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture