Chapter 24 - Chapter 24 1. Parliament votes governments in...

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Chapter 24 1. Parliament votes governments in and out of office; it elects and can impeach a president; it chooses 1/3 of the members of the Constitutional Court and of the Superior Council of the Judiciary; and it can amend the constitution. 2. An Abrogative Referendum is a referendum that can nullify or change existing law, but cannot create new law. The greatest problem in passing an AR is that 50% of eligible voters must participate for it to be binding; usually, the only people who show up are seeking to get a change or nullification, and this is often less than 50%. Judicial review is another check of the power of Parliament, though its power is limited due to Parliaments choice in 1/3 of Constitutional Court members. 3. Proposals can be introduced by cabinet members or individual parliamentarians; they then move to the committee corresponding to the relevant ministry; committees can kill proposals, pass them on to Parliament for vote, or pass the proposal directly ( sede deliberante ) into law. If the proposal is passed to Parliament, it is debated in two stages: the first discusses the broad principle of the bill and the second allows for the discussion of details and presenting amendments. The house presenting the bill then votes on it; if it passes it must
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Chapter 24 - Chapter 24 1. Parliament votes governments in...

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