Substance in Aristotle

Substance in Aristotle - Ancient Greek Philosophy I. Thesis...

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Ancient Greek Philosophy I. Thesis 1: For Aristotle, all substances are naturally occurring entities. Strictly speaking, artifacts (human-made objects) are not substances. II. Arguments supporting the thesis A. Reason One: a. A definition should just list those things without which the thing defined cannot exist b. A substance is something whose definition does not rely on the existence of other things besides itself c. A substance may be properly defined as the essence of a thing implications: essence can be understood as the most basic of things, that which “does not rely on the existence of other things besides itself”. Human-made objects inherently rely on humans in order to come into existence. Thus, a substance cannot be an artifact. Textual Support: Metaphysics, Book IV, Chapter 4, Lines 27-32 B. Reason Two: a. Science investigates causes and principles b. Science does not investigate the “being qua being” or the “whatness” of their subject c. Science instead assumes the “whatness” and bases subsequent inquiry on
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PHIL 201 taught by Professor Ambuel during the Fall '08 term at Mary Washington.

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Substance in Aristotle - Ancient Greek Philosophy I. Thesis...

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