SOC 1101 Syllabus - Introduction to Sociology SOC 1101...

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Introduction to Sociology SOC 1101 Spring 2016 Professor: Dr. Kristin Gordon Office: Old CE Building, Room G17 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Tuesday 11-12:15 & by appointment Teaching Assistants: Rebecca Watts Hull Office: Old CE Building, Room G41 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Tuesday 1:30-2:30 Teaching Assistants: Meagan South Office: Old CE Building, Room G41 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Thursday 11-12:00 “The sociological imagination enables its possessor to understand the larger historical scene in terms of its meaning for the inner life and the external career of a variety of individuals…The first fruit of this imagination-and the lesson of the social science that embodies it- is the idea that the individual can understand his own experience and gauge his own fate only by locating himself within his period, that he can know his chances in life only be becoming aware of those of all individuals in his circumstances.” C. Wright Mills, 1959 Course Description & Objectives Are things always what they seem? Sociology questions “what we think we know” and introduces new ways of understanding the world in which we live. In this course you will learn that common sense is not always a particularly good guide to understanding yourself and society. The course will provide you with an overview of the sociological perspective as well as a basic understanding of how sociologists do research. We will awaken your sociological imagination by giving you new ways to think about culture, health, environment, education, family, poverty, gender, race/ethnicity, crime and work. Learning Outcomes This course achieves the Area E Approved Learning Outcome which states, “Students will demonstrate the ability to describe the social, political, and economic forces that influence social behavior." In this class, students will learn how social, political, and economic forces influence social behavior through an exploration of the sociological approach to understanding social life and group behavior. We will situate this perspective within its wider social, economic and political context, by analyzing issues such as: culture, socialization, economy, crime and 1
criminal justice, social inequality, health, family and education. Students will demonstrate that they have met the Area E learning outcome through completion of three exams, four short essays, quizzes, and in-class assignments. Course Readings Henslin, James. 2007. Down to Earth Sociology: Introductory Readings, 14 th edition. New York: NY: The Free Press. There is one required text for this course. Readings marked with an asterisk can be found in Henslin, Down to Earth Sociology . Readings listed as “On Reserve” will be posted to T-Square. It is your responsibility to complete all the required readings before class and be prepared to contribute to class discussion. Some weeks the reading assignment is heavier than others so read ahead in the syllabus and plan adequate time to complete the readings before class.

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