week 4 Lecture Notes

week 4 Lecture Notes - Week Four Study Notes Absolute...

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Week Four Study Notes Absolute poverty is the term used for deprivation of basic necessities that is so severe that it is life threatening. Relative poverty is having significantly less than what is considered to be necessary in your society for a ‘good life’. Income in Canada ‘Class’ standing by income The ‘upper-uppers’ are Canada’s old money. This elite makes up less than 1% of the Canadian population. ‘Lower-uppers’, who make up between 2 and 4% of the population, say 600,000 to 1.2 million people, have family incomes in excess of $200,000/yr. Then there’s the middle class, which comprises 40 to 50% of the Canadian population. That’s somewhere between 13 and 16 million people. This category comprises a big swath of family incomes – anything from about $50,000 to $200,000 /yr. The working class have family incomes between about $30,000 and $50,000 and work primarily in blue collar and pink collar ghetto jobs. About one-third of Canadians just over 10 million, fall into this category. The last class your textbook discusses is the ‘lower’ class.
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course SOCI 1002 taught by Professor Reid during the Winter '08 term at Carleton CA.

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week 4 Lecture Notes - Week Four Study Notes Absolute...

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