John Brown

John Brown - Was John Brown a martyr or a madman? Analyzing...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Was John Brown a martyr or  a madman?  – Analyzing the  mentality and actions of John  Brown Tinuke Omolara Due: March 11, 2005 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
John Brown was a fervent man of action and had a mission to end slavery. Many historians see him as a fanatic and violet aspect of abolitionism but some view Brown as an important part in the efforts to end slavery. The definition of a martyr is one who makes great sacrifice or suffers in order to further a belief, cause or principle. A terrorist is a radical who employs terror as a political weapon. Abolishing slavery was no less a reasonable and appropriate cause for America, but even though John Brown supported this cause, he advanced in a violent and obsessive manner. John Brown was born May 9,1800 in Torrington, Connecticut into a religious Calvinist family. When Brown was five, they moved to Hudson, Ohio; a place where there were anti-slavery sentiments. Calvinists were strict believers in the word of God and thought that true believers abided by a rigorous code of what was right or wrong. This principle of life was incorporated throughout Brown’s life. Owen Brown, John Brown’s father, was a strict, successful tanner who opposed slavery. Besides teaching Brown the tannery trade, he taught him to hate slavery and never to part take in this evil. When Brown was just a young boy, he was driving cattle to Michigan and he stayed as a guest in a man’s house who owned a young slave. His host treated John Brown very nicely but cruelly beat his slave with an iron shovel. The personal witnessing of a brutal act against slaves would haunt Brown for life and he would vow to abolish slavery. (Whitman,http://www.wculture.org/history/jb11.html) 2
Background image of page 2
John Brown married his first wife, Dianethe Lusk and had seven children. Dianthe died but John married a young sixteen-year-old named Mary-Ann Day. She bore him thirteen more children, which made Brown’s family very big. In 1825, John Brown moved his whole family to Richmond, Pennsylvania. Brown opened many businesses to make ends meet to support his vast family. In addition, he opened up his barn as a station for the Underground Railroad. His involvement in the Underground Railroad was greatly recognized. He bathed, clothed, fed, protected and led the fugitives to the next station. Other conductors would do all but never lift a gun to protect the fugitives, which Brown would do for them. Success in the tannery business was not going well for John Brown. Furthermore, raising sheep and wool selling did not go as planned and in 1842, he went
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course CHEM 1034 taught by Professor Devicaris during the Spring '08 term at Temple.

Page1 / 8

John Brown - Was John Brown a martyr or a madman? Analyzing...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online