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Copy of MIS 371 Lpaper2 cd selections

Copy of MIS 371 Lpaper2 cd selections - 1 System Analysis...

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System Analysis & Design, Phase II SDLC 2 CD Case Selections: A Review of CD Selections Decisions of Phase II SDLC MIS 371, M 2:00-4:30 Dr. Robert Mullen October 16, 2006 1
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System Analysis & Design, Phase II SDLC 2 Objective of Phase II: The System Development Process Phase II of the SDLC is the Analysis Phase . Since we have already identified a need to make a change to the existing business model, and, the concluding research has determined that this project should be further analyzed. During the Analysis Phase we will discover who will use the system, what the system will do, and where and when it will be used. The Project Sponsor, to present to management, will use this information gathered to determine if the project should move forward. The Analysis Phase starts with requirement gathering. First we will create the requirement definition. This will define what exactly the new system will do from the business perspective. These requirements are both functional and non-functional . Functional requirements are generally made up of two categories, process-oriented, and information-oriented. The process- oriented function would allow users to look up the available inventory. The information-oriented function would allow users to find business costs and expenses. Non-functional requirements in the analysis phase are the behaviors the system will have. That will define system performance, security, and user controls. For example, non-functional requirement states, which web browsers, the system will use. The analyst will determine how the system needs to change, small changes like business process automation, (BPA), or larger changes such as business process improvement (BPI), or a complete overhaul, business process engineering (BPR). Once this determination has been made, the analyst will use several requirement-gathering techniques to acquire information from the users. These methods may be an array of questionnaires, interviews, JAD sessions, and observation. 2
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System Analysis & Design, Phase II SDLC 2 The analysis phase than consist of using a formal method to describe the business system. These are called Use Case. This allows the business people to describe in text the requirements for the system, for which the process model will be developed. There are four steps in creating a use case. 1) Identify the major use case, 2) Identify the major steps within each use case, 3) Identify elements within each step, 4) Confirm each use case. Now that the requirements are completed and a use case is written, the analyst will develop the final two structures for the new system, process model, and data model. The process model illustrates all the activities that are performed, whether it is the as-is system or the new system. Process models are logical based, as they describe the flow of data, using DFD, with out actually describing how that data will get there. The analyst can focus on the business needs without distraction from the technical capabilities. The data model describes the organization of the data without the technical detail, for the same reason as the process model, no technical distraction.
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