History of hockey - History of Hockey Kyle Bouffard...

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History of Hockey Kyle Bouffard Canadian Studies 101 December 18, 2006 Hockey has been a staple in the Canadian culture for hundreds of years now and is the country’s main pastime. When kids are very young they are taught to skate, thrown on the ice and learn the fundamentals of hockey, very similar to how the United States is with Baseball. Canada had been somewhat of a breeding ground for elite hockey players such as Maurice Richard, Wayne Gretzky, and the future of hockey Sidney Crosby. For years Canada has dominated the international hockey scene winning seven Olympic Gold Medals, and seventeen World Championship Gold Medals. Hockey is always has and always will be associated with Canada and vice versa. Let’s take a look at how hockey has evolved in to the great sport we have come to know as Canada’s own. The origins of hockey have been somewhat debated amongst hockey buffs. One of these theories comes from a British journalist in 1937, Ian Gordon, his side is that hockey was originated in 1853 with the British Royal family. Gordon writes “During the hard winter of 1853,
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Royal family members attending a house party. ..looking for a diversion on the frozen lake on the grounds, decided to play a form of field hockey on ice. Sides were chosen, sticks found and a wooden plug or stopper pried from a barrel was used a puck.”( McFarlane 1). Gordon claimed it was 20 years later when hockey reached Canada when a student at McGill University saw people playing field hockey on a trip to England, when he returned to Canada he and a few of his friends adopted the idea of field hockey to ice. While Gordon’s account of the creation of hockey in England seems like a good argument many North American hockey buffs would and do disagree with him due to the fact that he was unaware of the developments in hockey in Canada in the 1800’s. The theory that many Canadians choose to believe along with hockey historians is the theory presented by a Nova Scotia historian named Howard Dill. Dill claims that hockey was play on Long Pond in Windsor, Nova Scotia prior to 1810. Dr. Sandy Young, a supporter of Dill, presented some pretty positive proof of this in his book Beyond Heroes: A Sport History of Nova Scotia . Dr. Young presents a quote from Thomas Chandler Haliburton in a 1844 periodically called Attache. Recalling his days as a college student at Kings Collegiate, now Kings-Edgehill School Haliburton says “The boys let out racin’, yellin’,
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hollerin’ and whoopin’ like mad with pleasure, and the playground, and the game at bass in the fields, or hurley on the long pond on the ice or campin’ out at night at Chester Lakes to fish”(McFarlane 2). I have put “or hurley on the long pond on the ice” in bold because hockey was commonly referred to as hurley in its early stages of development. Haliburton graduated in 1810 this leads one to believe the “hurley” or hockey was played on Long Pond prior to 1810. Another account of “hurley” being played on
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History of hockey - History of Hockey Kyle Bouffard...

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