ENG140 2015-2016 syllabus - LITERATURE FOR OUR TIME ENG 140 Y1Y L0101 www.eng140.wordpress.com twitter\/instagram#eng140 Lecture Fridays 2-4 p.m(Bader

ENG140 2015-2016 syllabus - LITERATURE FOR OUR TIME ENG 140...

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LITERATURE FOR OUR TIME ENG 140 Y1Y L0101 ; twitter/instagram: #eng140 Lecture, Fridays, 2-4 p.m. (Bader Theatre); Tutorials, Fridays, 12 p.m. or 1 p.m. (location varies) Instructor : Prof. Cruz email : [email protected] Course administrator: Miriam Novick email: [email protected] Phone : 416-978-6144 Office Hours : JHB 712, Th 1 to 3 p.m. and by appt. C OURSE D ESCRIPTION AND O BJECTIVES : Just walk the streets of Toronto, and it is clear that we live, study, and work in a global city. It is easy to forget that the place we encounter every day is the result of centuries of transnational and global history. With our location in Toronto—and its connections to this history—as our inspiration, this course explores how authors have used literature to respond to, imagine, and make sense of a global and transnational world. This is our first objective. Certainly, over the course of the semester, we will learn about some canonical authors, their literary works, and the historical and cultural contexts that informed the texts. But you will also read a few works that may not be familiar to you. As we encounter novels, poetry, and drama, we’ll travel to and from a wide variety of places. Some will be close to home and set during our time, like a university classroom, a suburban home in Scarborough, a floor of an apartment in the GTA, or the shores of Lake Ontario. Others will be far away: an English country house, a nightclub in the Dominican Republic, a small college town somewhere in the United States. We’ll see the past and future, from our province during colonial times, to a haunted house in Ohio during the 1870s, to a post-apocalyptic Baltimore sometime in the twenty-first century. We’ll think about events on small and large scales: a global health care crisis; migrating to new places; a mother struggling with dementia; slavery and empire; environmental disasters and food shortages; and the relationship between science and art. We’ll meet time travelers and ghosts, college first-years and mathematicians, opera singers and poets, struggling parents and searching teenagers. How does literature examine a transnational and global past, present, and future? What is literature’s unique place in this world? What does literature teach us about our connections to the past, and how we might connect with each other in the present? Along the way, this class will accomplish a second objective: to introduce you to literary genres (poetry, drama, and prose fiction), to the skills you need to analyze different forms of literature, and to some key terms we use in literary analysis . Therefore, this course is also an introduction to the English major and minor (although you need not be an English major/minor to succeed in the class). Our final objective will be to practice critical analysis. By this I mean that you should be able to 1) notice interesting details in a work, 2) think about the meaning behind these details, and 3) be able to talk and write about the link between these details and their cultural meaning.

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