Chapter 16 Forms of Government

Chapter 16 Forms of Government - Chapter 16: Forms of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 16: Forms of Government The Classical Typology Typology = a broad classification scheme of governmental systems In the words of Aristotle, “he who bids the law rule may be deemed to bid God and Reason alone rule, but he who bids man rule adds an element of the beast; for desire is a wild beast, and passion perverts the minds of rulers, even when they are the best of men. The law is reason unaffected by desire.” Plato held that there are two basic ways in which rule may be conducted: - Lawfully - Lawlessly Either the governors are bound by constitutional rules that they are not free to set aside, or they rule according to unchecked whims and emotional desires. Aristotle added that rule by law is the general interest of the entire community, whereas arbitrary rule represents exploitation of the ruled for the special interest of the governors. - Also, that rule in the common interest tends to be seen as legitimate, and gives rulers authority that the ruled will obey voluntarily, while selfish government does not seem legitimate to those who are oppressed and therefore has to be sustained be coercion and fear. -
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This test prep was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course POLS 100 taught by Professor Johnf.young during the Winter '08 term at UNBC.

Page1 / 2

Chapter 16 Forms of Government - Chapter 16: Forms of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online