Paine Questions - Xochitl Frazier 1 Why do you think Thomas Paine writes Common Sense anonymously and how does he think his work will be remembered

Paine Questions - Xochitl Frazier 1 Why do you think Thomas...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

Xochitl Frazier1. Why do you think Thomas Paine writes Common Sense anonymously and how does he think his work will be remembered?First is the obvious, Paine did not want to make it seem like he wrote Common Sense for self-recognition. Instead, he articulately used ethos in order to convince the audience that his thoughtswould benefit the whole. He wrote in a manner that made people feel like they were a part of something greater than themselves. Second, Thomas Paine would have been a fool not to write such a pamphlet anonymously. He published something in favor of American independence at a time when monarchial rule was the only known form of government. For him to put his name on something that would cause so much controversy would be signing off on death. Religion and politics are two topics that are sure to cause an uproar of the masses, and Paine addresses them both in Common Sense. Therefore, I wholeheartedly believe that he decided to publish it anonymously for his own safety.As far as remembrance, Paine did not seem to have any expectations. He had intentions of publishing his works for the inhabitants of America and letting the people decide what to do withthat information. I do not think that Paine had any idea what a movement he would start. 2. According to Paine, what is the difference between society and government? Paine illuminated the very distinct differences between society and government, essentially one is good and one is evil. Society is produced by our wants, promotes our happiness, encourages intercourse, and is by all means a blessing in every state (Paine, Common Sense, 69). Government, on the other hand, is produced by our wickedness, restrains our vices, creates distinction, and in its best state a necessary evil (Paine, Common Sense, 69). He draws the line between the two so confidently that it’s rightfully named “Common Sense”. After pointing out that not one good thing comes from government, it seems ignorant to pass up an alternative view such as the one Paine so adequately presented.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture