Lab 6 Crash Lab - 1 Physics 211R Lab Report Template Crash...

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An Introduction to Physical Science
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Chapter 3 / Exercise 01
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
Expert Verified
1 Physics 211R: Lab Crash Lab Physics 211R: Lab Report Template Crash Lab (Impulse, Momentum & Energy) PRINT THIS PAGE (p. 1) WHEN YOU BEGIN AND INCLUDE IN YOUR REPORT Warm-Up: As you prepare for your test, you review in your mind some basic relationships among the quantities involved: kinetic energy ( K ), velocity ( v ), momentum ( p ), Impulse ( J ), and average net force ( F avg ). K v p J F avg On the left, draw the momentum-time p x ( t ) graph for a block moving to the right that hits a wall and then bounces back with half the speed it originally had (assume no friction). On the right, draw the diagram if friction were present. Q6. What will be your coordinate system? ( Sketch the axes on this photo below ). Will both your motion sensors use that coordinate system by default (and if not, how can you handle that)? Q9. Measure all your masses: Vehicle 1 (no labels): m 1 = __________________ Vehicle 2 (as in “2 - faced”): m 2 = _________________ Black bar: m bb = _______________________ p x t p x t
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An Introduction to Physical Science
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Chapter 3 / Exercise 01
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
Expert Verified
2 Physics 211R: Lab Crash Lab Physics 211R: Lab Crash Lab (Impulse, Momentum & Energy) You are just started your job as a research assistant in the Crash Lab, which studies what happens to vehicles and their occupants during crashes and thus how to design cars so that crashes are less likely to seriously injure passengers. (There is such a lab like this at Penn State, the Larson Institute Crash Safety Research Facility check out their website sometime at ). Before they let you crash real vehicles, you need to prove that you can analyze a crash on a scale model, which is what you will be doing today. In particular, you have been charged with answering these specific questions from actual crash data that you will collect: I. Is an individual vehicle’s linear momentum ( p = m v ) conserved during a collision? II. Is the total linear momentum ( P = p 1 + p 2 ) of the system of two vehicles conserved during a collision? III. Is the total mechanical energy ( E = K + U ) of the system of two vehicles conserved during a collision? (Is it the same before & after the collision?) What about just K? IV. Does the type of collision that is, whether the vehicles bounce off one another or whether the vehicles stick together affect what happens to the momentum and the mechanical energy? V. In a collision between a stationary vehicle and a moving vehicle, which vehicle experiences the larger change in momentum? VI. In a collision between a more massive vehicle and a less massive vehicle, which vehicle experiences the larger change in momentum? Warm-up: As you prepare for your test, you review in your mind some basic relationships among the quantities involved: kinetic energy ( K ), velocity ( v ), momentum ( p ), Impulse ( J ), and average net force ( F avg ). Label the relationships on your printed sheet . K v p J F avg You also refresh in your mind a useful tool for visualizing what happens to the momentum of an object or system during a collision or some other interaction.

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