symp04 - Proceedings of the Fall 2004 Astronomy 233...

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Unformatted text preview: Proceedings of the Fall 2004 Astronomy 233 Symposium on MEASUREMENTS OF THE HUBBLE CONSTANT Edward Damon, David Eisler, Daniel Rasolt, Amy Shaw Kyle Story, Artin Teymourian, and Greg Vesper Astronomy 233* Department of Astronomy Cornell University D.B. Campbell and J. Deneva Editors December 2, 2004 *Astronomy 233 is offered by the Cornell University As- tronomy Department and the College of Arts and Sci- ences under the John S. Knight Institute Sophomore Seminar Program. i Astronomy 233 From Planets to Galaxies: The Origins of Cosmic Structures was taught during the fall semester by Professor Don Campbell with the very able assistance of Astronomy and Space Sciences graduate student Julia Deneva. The course is intended to provide students interested in majoring, or concentrat- ing, in astronomy with an introduction to current forefront topics in the field and also to expose them to aspects of a professional research career such as the sym- posium. It is also intended to hone their writing skills with emphasis on writing for specific audiences. There are four writing assignments of which three, includ- ing the symposium paper, are revised by the students based on suggestions and comments from the teaching assistant and instructor on a first draft. Astronomy 233 was one of the first Knight Institute sophomore seminars to be offered at Cornell. The focus this semester was on a discussion of issues related to the origins of cosmic objects from planets to stars to galaxies to the cosmos. The major emphasis was on the search for extra solar planets, star formation, the evidence for the existence of dark matter and dark energy and issues related to cosmology. Professors Phil Nicholson and Paul Goldsmith gave guest lectures on, respectively, results from the Cassini mission to the Saturn system and star for- mation. Julia Deneva gave the students a very comprehensive lecture on pulsars. The latter part of the course concentrated on issues related to cosmology and the measurement of the expansion rate of the universe as given by the Hubble constant. The talks by the students in the symposium Measurements of the Hubble Con- stant were based on the papers included in these proceedings. The students summarized papers in the scientific literature that discuss different aspects of recent efforts to measure the Hubble constant. The papers in these proceedings represent their original work with, occasionally, very minor editing to conform to the style of the proceedings. We would like to congratulate the authors for the quality of the papers and compliment them for their enthusiasm and energy. Donald B. Campbell Julia Deneva Ithaca, New York 02 December 2004 Table of Contents Foreword i Period-Luminosity and Period-Luminosity-Color Relations of Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds Amy Shaw 1 Measurement of the Distance to Galaxy NGC4258 Greg Vesper 7 Measuring the Hubble Constant through the Tully-Fisher Relationship Edward Damon 13 A Derivation of the Hubble Constant Using the Fundamental...
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symp04 - Proceedings of the Fall 2004 Astronomy 233...

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