symp06 - Proceedings of the Fall 2006 Astronomy 233...

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Proceedings of the Fall 2006 Astronomy 233 Symposium on STAR FORMATION AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE PARADOX OF YOUTH Anand Bhaskar, Piyanat “Boom” Kittiwisit, Kim-Yen Nguyen and Lamarr Parsons Astronomy 233* Department of Astronomy Cornell University M.P. Haynes and M.S. Rice Editors November 30, 2006 *Astronomy 233 is ofered by the Cornell University Astronomy Department and the College oF Arts and Sciences under the John S. Knight Institute Sophomore Seminar Program.
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i Astronomy 233 “Star Formation: From the Early Universe to the Solar Neighborhood” was taught during the fall semester of 2006 by Professor Martha Haynes with the always willing and able assistance of Astronomy graduate student Melissa Rice. This course is intended to provide students interested in majoring or concentrating in astronomy with an introduction to current forefront topics in the Feld and also to expose them to pratical aspects of a professional research career such as the circumstance of the current “symposium”. Astronomy 233 this semester revolved around the discussion of how the process of star formation has varied in di±erent locations within the Milky Way and other galaxies and over cosmic time. One of the most fascinating regions of the Milky Way is the Galactic Center. Obscured at optical wavelengths, modern infrared, radio and X-ray telescopes have allowed us to peer into the heart of the Milky Way. The compact, unresolved radio continuum source known as SgrA* has been shown to be a supermassive black hole with a mass 3 million times that of the Sun. The stellar density around the black hole is 300,000 times that of the Solar Neighborhood. Such a region is so dense that molecular clouds, the stu± from which stars are formed, are subjected to tremendous tidal forces. Our conventional ideas of how stars might form do not work there, yet there are lots of hot, blue, massive young stars. How could they have formed? As part of our discussion of star formation, students were placed in the role of summarizing papers selected from the profesional literature pertaining to “Star ²ormation at the Galac- tic Center: The Paradox of Youth.” The papers contained herein represent their original work, with minor editting mainly to conform to the style used in producing this volume. The students are asked to forgive us for modiFcations made in the editorial process. All of us wish to compliment the authors on their contributions, on their diligence and enthusiasm, and on their patience. Martha P. Haynes Melissa S. Rice Ithaca, New York 30 November 2006
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Table of Contents Foreword i Star Formation In A Dense Gaseous Disk Anand Bhaskar 1 Around Sgr A* IRS 16 SW: Evidence of the Remnant Core of Piyanat “Boom” Kittiwisit 5 the Disrupted Cluster in the Galactic Center Potential IRS 13E Black Hole Kim-Yen Nguyen 9 The Truncated Mass Function of the Arches Cluster Lamarr Parsons 13 Papers under Review
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2008 for the course ASTRO 2233 taught by Professor Haynes,m/giovanelli during the Fall '04 term at Cornell.

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symp06 - Proceedings of the Fall 2006 Astronomy 233...

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