Clinical Practice Guidelines Analysis and Application - Running head CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES ANALYSIS AND Clinical Practice Guidelines Analysis and

Clinical Practice Guidelines Analysis and Application -...

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Running head: CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES ANALYSIS AND 1 Clinical Practice Guidelines Analysis and Application Chamberlain College of Nursing Brenda Mabry NR 505: Advanced Research Methods: Evidence-Based Practice February 2016
CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES ANALYSIS AND 2 Clinical Practice Guidelines Analysis and Application Neuropathic pain is a complex pain which stems from an injury or malfunction to the nervous system (Taverner, 2014). The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) further defined neuropathic pain as a pain stemming from a wound or malady, which affects the sensory systems (Taverner, 2014). No specific data denotes how many patients are afflicted with neuropathic pain but it is estimated there are millions of people who have this type of pain (Taverner, 2014) throughout the world. Neuropathic pain can be hard to treat and require multiple trials of different treatments to find the right therapy or combination of therapies to relieve the pain. Along with nondrug therapies, medication is commonly used to treat this chronic pain. Opioids such as morphine or oxycodone should not be used unless the patient is going to a pain treatment specialist. Taverner (2014) recommends using the clinical practice guidelines (CPG) of 2013 from the National Institute for Care and Excellence as a guideline to treat neuropathic pain. This paper will discuss the scope and purpose of the CPG: The pharmacological management of neuropathic pain in adults in non-specialist settings (National Institute for Health, 2013). Also being discussed and reviewed is the stakeholder involvement, rigor of development, clarity and presentation, and its applicability to neuropathic pain patients. The guideline summary Neuropathic pain in adults: Pharmacological management in non-specialist settings (2013) has been established by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to provide a clinical practice guideline for providers who do not work in a pain treatment specialty. The guidelines were updated and accepted in 2013 with the purpose and objective of improving care in adults with neuropathic pain by providing a guideline for treatment by non-pain management providers. The provider is to use the evidence-based
CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES ANALYSIS AND 3 recommendations from the guidelines for prescribing medications for patients with neuropathic pain. The scope of the guidelines is any adult patient with neuropathic pain that is not going to a pain specialist provider. The questions that the CPG are addressing are: What medications should be used to treat neuropathic pain when not going to a pain specialist; What is the most effective drug for treating neuropathic pain in adults who do not go to a specialty pain clinic; and, What is the most effective combination of medication treatments, if any, for adults with neuropathic pain not going to a pain clinic? The target population only applies to adults that have neuropathic pain who do not go to a pain clinic for treatment.

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