Sol19 - CHAPTER 19 Network Layer: Logical Addressing...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 CHAPTER 19 Network Layer: Logical Addressing Solutions to Review Questions and Exercises Review Questions 1. An IPv4 address is 32 bits long. An IPv6 address is 128 bits long. 2. IPv4 addresses are usually written in decimal form with a decimal point (dot) sep- arating the bytes. This is called dotted-decimal notation . Each address is 4 bytes. IPv6 addresses are usually written in hexadecimal form with a colon separating the bytes. This is called hexadecimal notation . Each address is 16 bytes or 32 hexa- decimal digits. 3. Classful addressing assigns an organization a Class A, Class B, or Class C block of addresses. Classless addressing assigns an organization a block of contiguous addresses based on its needs. 4. Classes A , B , and C are used for unicast communication. Class D is for multicast communication and Class E addresses are reserved for special purposes. 5. A block in class A address is too large for almost any organization. This means most of the addresses in class A are wasted and not used. A block in class C is probably too small for many organizations. 6. A mask in classful addressing is used to find the first address in the block when one of the addresses is given. The default mask refers to the mask when there is no subnetting or supernetting. 7. The network address in a block of addresses is the first address. The mask can be ANDed with any address in the block to find the network address. 8. In subnetting , a large address block could be divide into several contiguous groups and each group be assigned to smaller networks called subnets. In supernetting , several small address blocks can be combined to create a larger range of addresses. The new set of addresses can be assigned to a large network called a supernet. A subnet mask has more consecutive 1s than the corresponding default mask. A supernet mask has less consecutive 1s than the corresponding default mask. 9. Multicast addresses in IPv4 are those that start with the 1110 pattern. Multicast addresses in IPv6 are those that start with the 11111111 pattern.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 10. Home users and small businesses may have created small networks with several hosts and need an IP address for each host. With the shortage of addresses, this is a serious problem. A quick solution to this problem is called network address trans- lation (NAT ). NAT enables a user to have a large set of addresses internally and one address, or a small set of addresses, externally. The traffic inside can use the large set; the traffic outside, the small set. Exercises 11. a. 2 8 = 256 b. 2 16 = 65536 c. 2 64 = 1.846744737 × 10 19 12. 2 x = 1024 x = log 2 1024 = 10 13. 3 10 = 59,049 14. 15. a. 127.240.103.125 b. 175.192.240.29 c. 223.176.31.93 d. 239.247.199.29 16. a.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This homework help was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course JAVA CDA 4506 taught by Professor Eisler during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

Page1 / 10

Sol19 - CHAPTER 19 Network Layer: Logical Addressing...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online