Fall 07 - Homework #13 - In general, its unit is the...

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9.17; 10.5, 6, 7, 11 Ch. 9 #17 Suppose that t is measured in seconds, f(t) is measured in volts and δ(t-t0) is dimensionless. Then the integral of f(t) δ(t-t0) over t would give dimension V*sec since it’s summing the area. But we know the answer to that integral is f(t0), which is in Volts. Hence, δ(t-t0) has to have unit 1/sec.
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Unformatted text preview: In general, its unit is the inverse of that of the variable of integration (i.e. its parameter): 1/sec, 1/m, C/m f(t)=e^(-jt) causes unbounded output. Non-causal: Let g(t)=f(t 2 ). Therefore g(2)=f(4), which is a future input. Also by the same logic as e, non-causal....
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This homework help was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course ECE 210 taught by Professor Whoever during the Spring '07 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Fall 07 - Homework #13 - In general, its unit is the...

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