Assignment 3 research paper

Assignment 3 research paper - Dialectic Research Paper by...

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Dialectic Research Paper by DeeAnne Bennett SST 623 American History in the Secondary Curriculum Nova Southeastern University June 17, 2007
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I. Introduction Following the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, Americans began to look hungrily at the land just across their southwest border. Over time, Americans came to believe that it was their God given duty to expand their democratic traditions all the way to the Pacific Ocean. This concept of Manifest Destiny will come to be the policy of the American government and will be used to justify America’s imperialistic tendencies. The expansion of American boundaries and the consequences of that expansion will occupy the economic, social, and political landscape of the United States throughout the 19 th century. The institutionalization of Manifest Destiny into the formal government policy can be traced directly to the annexation of Texas in 1846. II. Historical background The Mexican government granted colonization rights to the American Moses Austin in hopes of creating a buffer territory against encroachment by the land-hungry Americans. Moses Austin died before his colonization project became a reality, but the mission was taken over by his son, Stephen F. Austin. In 1821, with permission from the Mexican government, Stephen Austin brought 300 families across Sabine River to the region along the Brazos River, where the first American colony in Texas was established (Allen). In exchange for the generous land grants, the Mexican government attached certain conditions to those grants as part of its plan to use Texas as a buffer. Each settler had to agree to become a Mexican citizen, to adopt the Roman Catholic religion, and to give up the practice of slavery. Since the Texas colony was governed very loosely, much as the American colonies had been only loosely controlled by Great Britain during the century and a half before the American Revolution, the Mexican government turned a blind eye to violations of the agreements (Allen). The status of Mexican citizenship changed very little in terms of the loyalties of the American 2
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settlers; they were Americans first, Mexicans second. In 1830 the Mexican government reversed itself and prohibited further immigration into Texas. Mexican dictator Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, somewhat after the fashion of his counterpart, King George III, decided that it was time to make the Texans tow the line. In response to the increased attention of the Mexican government, the Texans successfully rebelled in 1837 (Allen). Texas independence was seen merely as a road to annexation by the United States government by the settlers. Their intention was not to declare a separate nation, but rather they immediately applied for annexation. When the Texas minister in Washington, D.C., proposed annexation to the administration of Martin Van Buren in August 1837, the request was refused since the administration anticipated that it would lead to war with Mexico. Anti-slavery sentiment in the United States undoubtedly influenced Van Buren as did constitutional issues
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Assignment 3 research paper - Dialectic Research Paper by...

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