Final Exam - Final Exam by DeeAnne Bennett SST 623 American...

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Final Exam by DeeAnne Bennett SST 623 American History I in the Secondary Curriculum Nova Southeastern University June 7, 2007
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1. In developing a plan of government the framers of the United States Constitution debated and compromised on a number of issues. Some of these issues are listed below. Issues Choosing a President Federalism Representation Slavery Taxation Trade Choose three of the issues and for each one chosen: a. Explain the arguments on both sides of the debate. b. Describe the compromise that resulted from the argument in the debate. (You must use a different compromise for each issue chosen.) The Constitutional Convention of 1787 met to try and ameliorate the problems inherent in the Articles of Confederation. While the outcome of the convention created a new national government, it was not without its disagreements. The most significant of the disagreements were the issues of federalism, representation, and slavery. The issue of federalism derived from the colonial mistrust of government under British rule. In forming a new government, those against a strong central government, Anti- Federalists, were afraid that the Constitution did not protect individual rights and provide for the power of the States over the central government. They predicted that under this Constitution, the president would become a monarch, the people would be impoverished by increasing moneys needed to support the central government, and that martial law would be a de facto way of life in order to enforce the central government’s policies. The Federalists, on the other hand, were certain of the virtue of their new government system. They sought to preserve the American nation which could fraction into 13 separate countries. They also desired to protect property rights and the minority of the population from the wants of the majority. They believed that the Articles of Confederation had
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obstructed interstate trade, created a weak economic system with the variety of currencies available, and did not allow for the protection of the republic because it did not have the taxing authority needed. The debated was solved, at least temporarily, by a series of compromises. The first was somewhat accidental. By creating a system of checks and balances, the government was not likely to be commandeered by any one faction. By creating a system of three branches, each with its own functions, they created a system to alleviate the fears of autocratic government. The Constitution also allowed for a system to change the government through the amendment system. The final ratification of the Constitution was dependent on the inclusion of a statement of individual rights to appease the Anti-Federalists. This would become known as the Bill of Rights. The Federalists gained the government being acknowledged as “ the supreme law of the land” and the “necessary and proper clause” which gave them wide ranging powers to avoid the issues suffered under the Articles of Confederation.
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Final Exam - Final Exam by DeeAnne Bennett SST 623 American...

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