MMW 2 final review- passages

MMW 2 final review- passages - Page 1 of 36 MMW2, Section...

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Page 1 of 36 MMW2, Section C03 Student-Authored Text Compilation March 17, 2007 EDITOR’S DISCLAIMER The following material was written by the members of MMW2 Section C03. It by no means constitutes a complete study guide. Entries are the responsibility of individual authors. The editor of this compilation is not responsible for any incorrect information, including but not limited to misquoting, incorrect terminology, incorrect definitions, misplaced emphasis or any other material that is otherwise less than perfect. Any benefit derived from this compilation, including increased understanding of lecture material, intellectual epiphanies, improved final exam scores, improved sense of well-being, and/or increased appreciation of life, are the sole responsibility of the authors and readers. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK
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Page 2 of 36 China Reader #14, 16 Contributed by Sarah Taylor 14. Li Chi. Book of Rites. An Encyclopedia of Ancient Ceremonial Usages, Religious Creeds, and Social Institutions . The concept of li played a very important role in daily life for followers of Confucianism. Li can mean rules of behavior, manners, rituals and more. The Li Chi tells people how to act toward superiors and inferiors, how to mourn, and how to speak depending on rank. Propriety: the act of giving and repaying what was given to you; reciprocity. Interactions with Elders: Elders are always shown the utmost respect. Things are done to make life easier for them, such as carrying a stool and staff for elder's use or warming parents' bed. Filial Piety: obedience to parents and acting appropriately to siblings and other elders, regardless of relation. Mourning and Funerals: Mourning customs are very extensive. Followers of Confucianism engage in a maximum mourning period of 3 years and during mourning their lives change drastically. Mourners must appear quite overcome and look alarmed and restless. They lived in a special mourning hut and wore certain garments. They were expected to look weary and kind of emaciated. It was up to followers of Confucianism to follow the rites. It was thought that if they did they would improve their lives and have a more meaningful existence. Excerpt from Li Chi When (a father) has just died, (the son) should appear quite overcome, and as if he were at his wits' end; when the corpse has been put into the coffin, he should cast quick and sorrowful glances around, as if her were seeking for something and could not find it. .. 16. The Book of Songs. The Book of Songs is associated with the Zhou royal house. The poems are said to have come from the Zhou ancestral settlement near Mount Qi. These poems offer some historical perspective into ancient China, as they mention the civilizing influence by the Zhou on their neighbors, probably to the south. Poems like Birth to the People , The People of our Race , and Kite-Owl all recount legends of how Chinese civilization was founded and its early rulers.
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They can be easily identified because they are written in poem form, not prose. Excerpt from
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course MMW 2 taught by Professor Chang during the Winter '08 term at UCSD.

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MMW 2 final review- passages - Page 1 of 36 MMW2, Section...

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