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project article.docx - How Exercise Boosts Your Brainpower...

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How Exercise Boosts Your Brainpower Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on Pinterest You know that logging miles on the treadmill can give you a trim body, but adding more cardio to your life will also ratchet up your smarts, boost your productivity, rev your energy, and turn you into an unstoppable success machine. Even one 30-minute cardio session pumps extra blood to your brain, delivering the oxygen and nutrients it needs to perform at max efficiency. Cardio also floods the brain with chemicals that enhance functions such as memory, problem solving, and decision making. And new research has found that this kind of exercise may even cause permanent structural changes to the brain itself. "Cardiovascular health is more important than any other single factor in preserving and improving learning and memory," says Thomas Crook, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and memory researcher. "You're working out your brain at the same time as your heart." And the mental mojo you get from cardio isn't limited to making you smarter. It also has the power to lower your stress levels and shake you out of a funk. It's no coincidence that so many high-achieving women—from Madonna to Condoleezza Rice—share the cardio habit. Here's how it works. Which works better — cardio or weight training ? Your Brain on Cardio Anyone who has ever tackled a StairMaster has a pretty good idea of what happens to your body when you break a sweat. But here's what's going on in your head at the same time: All that extra blood bathes your brain cells in oxygen and glucose, which they need to function. The more they get, the better they perform. Every muscle you move also sends hormones rushing to your brain. There, they mix with a chemical called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, which plays a role in brain cell growth, mood regulation, and learning. "BDNF is like fertilizer for the brain," says John J. Ratey,
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Ph.D., a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. "Without it, our brains can't take in new information or make new cells."
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This homework help was uploaded on 03/23/2016 for the course PSYC 1101 taught by Professor Hoffman during the Fall '08 term at Georgia State.

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project article.docx - How Exercise Boosts Your Brainpower...

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