[3] Jan 28 - Foucault The Modern Disciplining of Sexualities - SOC395 GENDER AND SEXUALITY Lecture 3 Foucault Readings o Foucault Michel 1980 The

[3] Jan 28 - Foucault The Modern Disciplining of...

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SOC395 – GENDER AND SEXUALITY January 28, 2016 Lecture 3: Foucault - Readings: o Foucault, Michel. 1980. The history of Sexuality, Vol. 1 . (Pp. 1-76) o Rupp, Leila. 2012. “Sexual Fluidity ‘Before Sex’”. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture & Society. (37:850-856) Foucault - Repressive Hypothesis: Sex has been repressed in society o Cultural repression Became a taboo to talk about it - censored o Economic repression Sex was repressed because the middle class felt economically displaced Not in sync with the notions of capitalism Talking/having non reproductive sex -> wasting your Should be reproductive, if it’s not, it’s not economical “Libido economy” Direct your energy towards maximizing labour capacity, capitalism instead of wasting it - He is against the repressive hypothesis o Repression between who can speak about sex – experts should and should be authorized Repressing non-experts Making it an object of knowledge o Page 12: “A first survey made from this viewpoint seems to indicate that since the end of the sixteenth century, the “putting not discourse of sex,” far from undergoing a process of restriction, on the contrary has been subjected to a mechanism of increasing incitement’ that the techniques of power exercised over sex have not obeyed a principle of rigorous selection, but rather one of the dissemination and implantation of polymorphous sexualities’ and that the will to knowledge has not come to a halt in the face of a taboo that must not be lifted, but has persisted in constituting – despite many mistakes, of course – a science of sexuality. “ o Page 17: “The seventeenth century, then, was the beginning of an age of repression emblematic of what we call the bourgeois societies, an age which perhaps we still have not completely left behind. Calling sex by its name thereafter became more difficult and more costly. As if in order to gain mastery over it in reality, it had first been necessary to subjugate it at the level of language, control its free circulation in speech, expunge it from the things that were said, and extinguish the words that rendered it too visibly present. And even these prohibitions, it

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