{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Fungi notes - Fungi Multicellular filamentous organisms...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fungi Yeasts Mold Multicellular filamentous organisms forming hyphae. Ex: Mildew Unicellular budding organisms. Multicellular filamentous organisms forming hyphae. Ex: mildew Chemoheterotrophs Chemoheterotrophs Chemoheterotrophs Most are aerobic or facultatively anaerobic. Very few are anaerobic. Most are aerobic or facultatively anaerobic. Very few are anaerobic. Most are aerobic or facultatively anaerobic. Very few are anaerobic. Most are saprophytic in soil and water. Most are saprophytic in soil and water. Most are saprophytic in soil and water. Eukaryotic organisms Eucaryotic organisms Eucaryotic organisms. Often identified on physical appearance of colony and microscopic appearance spores. Vegetative : cells with catabolism and growth. o Vegetative hyphae growing in culture media or woodlog Spores can be asexual or sexual . o Spores are generate by meiosis Cell membrane: contain sterols . (steroid alcohol, in humans these clumps are cholesterol) o Ergosterol in fungi. o There are drugs that are ergosterol suppressant. Cells walls contain glucans, mannans, chitin (no peptidoglycan) o Chitin is made out of poly-n-acetylglucosamine o Nikkomycin is an chitin inhibitor o Chitin can be found on cytoskeleton of a cockroaches or crab. Nutritional Adaptations of Fungi Often grow where bacteria don’t grow. Fungi prefer pH 5.0, at which most bacteria do not grow. o Bacteria normally grow on higher pH. o Normal human pH is 7.4 o A patient is acidosis when their pH is 7.2 Since they are aerobic, they often grow on surfaces. Can survive in high concentration of sugar or salt. Can grow on low moisture. Require less nitrogen than bacteria Can metabolize complex carbohydrate like wood, whereas most bacteria cannot. o Therefore: growth on painted walls, shoe leather, discarded newspapers = mildew.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fungi Eukaryotes Mycology: Fungi, yeasts, molds Chemoheterotrophs: need organic “food” Usually aerobic or acultative anaerobic Soil and water saprophytes: decompose plant materials. 100 of 100,000 species are human pathogens Thousands cause plant disease. Thallus Body of fungus or molds The thallus of a fungus is usually called a mycelium (long filamentous hyphae). Includes filaments of hyphae made up of cells, each with nucleus. Reproduce by elongation at tip usually with cross-walls → septate hyphae If no septa coenocytic hyphae (non-septate hyphae) Waronin body – a rounded organelle occurring near the septa in at least some Ascomycetes or Deuteromycetes.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Spring '08
  • Langford
  • Fungi, Emericella Blastomyces Ascomycota Ajellomyces Candida Ascomycota Pichia Histoplasma Ascomycota Ajelomyces Microsporum Ascomycota Nannizia Penicillium Ascomycota Eupenicillium

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern