3070_PSet-6_Solutions[1]

3070_PSet-6_Solutions[1] - Economics 3070-001 Spring 2008...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Economics 3070-001 Spring 2008 Problem Set 6 Solutions 1. Ch 7, Problem 7.2 A grocery shop is owned by Mr. Moore and has the following statement of  revenues and costs: Revenues $250,000 Supplies $25,000 Electricity $6,000 Employee   salaries $75,000 Mr. Moore’s salary $80,000 Mr. Moore always has the option of closing down his shop and renting out the  land for  $100,000 .  Also, Mr. Moore himself has job offers at a local supermarket  at a salary of  $95,000  and at a nearby restaurant at  $65,000 .  He can only work  one job, though.  What are the shop’s accounting costs?  What are Mr. Moore’s  economic costs?  Should Mr. Moore shut down his shop? The accounting costs are simply the sum:  $25,000 + $6,000 + $75,000 + $80,000 =  $186,000. The economic costs also include the opportunity cost of the land rental ($100,000)  and the  extra  salary Mr. Moore would earn if he selected his next best alternative  ($95,000 - $80,000 = $15,000).  So, the economic costs are $186,000 + $100,000 +  $15,000 = $301,000. Should Mr. Moore shut down his shop?  His economic costs exceed his revenues by  $301,000 - $250,000 = $51,000.  Since his economic costs are greater than his  revenues, he should shut down his shop.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Economics 3070-001 Spring 2008 2. Ch 7, Problem 7.4 A firm uses two inputs, capital and labor, to produce output.  Its production  function exhibits a diminishing marginal rate of technical substitution. a. If the price of capital and labor services both increase by the same  percentage amount (e.g.,  20  percent), what will happen to the cost- minimizing input quantities for a given output level? If the price of both inputs change by the same percentage amount, the slope of the  isocost line ( r w / - ) will not change.  Since we are holding the level of output  fixed, the point at which the isocost line is tangent to the (fixed) isoquant does not  change.  Therefore, the cost-minimizing quantities of the inputs will not change. b. If the price of capital increases by  20  percent while the price of labor  increases by  10  percent, what will happen to the cost-minimizing input  quantities for a given output level? If the price of capital increases by a larger percentage than the price of labor, the  isocost lines become flatter (since  r w /  decreases).  This means that the point of  tangency will move to the southeast as shown in the diagram below: Original Cost-Minimizing  New Cost-Minimizing  L K
Background image of page 2
Economics 3070-001 Spring 2008 Another way to think about this is to realize that when the price of capital  increases by a larger percentage than the price of labor, labor has become cheaper 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

3070_PSet-6_Solutions[1] - Economics 3070-001 Spring 2008...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online