Lecture 10_Categorical propositions; quantity, quality, and distribution

Lecture 10_Categorical propositions; quantity, quality, and distribution

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Lecture 10 Categorical Propositions Quantity, Quality, and Distribution Patrick Maher Philosophy 102 Spring 2009
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Categorical propositions Categorical propositions are propositions that express a relationship between two categories or classes of things. They can be expressed in one of the following standard forms: All S are P Some S are P No S are P Some S are not P Examples All murderers are criminals. Some criminals are murderers. No whales are fish. Some things that glitter are not pieces of gold. “All S are not P ” is not a standard form.
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The parts of a categorical proposition The standard forms again: All S are P Some S are P No S are P Some S are not P The parts are: Quantifier: “all”, “some”, or “no” Subject term: S Copula: “are” or “are not” Predicate term: P
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In the following categorical propositions, identify the quantifier, subject term, copula, and predicate term. Question 1
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Lecture 10_Categorical propositions; quantity, quality, and distribution

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