Lecture 1_Arguments, premises, and conclusions

Lecture 1_Arguments, premises, and conclusions - Lecture 1...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 1 Arguments, Premises, and Conclusions Patrick Maher Philosophy 102 Spring 2009 Arguments Definition An argument is a group of statements, one or more of which (the premises) are claimed to support one of the others (the conclusion). Examples All crimes are violations of the law. Theft is a crime. Therefore, theft is a violation of the law. Some crimes are misdemeanors. Murder is a crime. Therefore, murder is a misdemeanor. Definition Logic is the science that evaluates arguments. Conclusion indicators A statement following one of these words is usually a conclusion: therefore thus consequently so it follows that hence There are many other conclusion indicators. Example Corporate raiders leave their target corporation with a heavy debt burden and no increase in productive capacity. Consequently , corporate raiders are bad for the business community. P : Corporate raiders leave their target corporation with a heavy debt burden and no increase in productive capacity....
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2009 for the course PHIL 102 taught by Professor Weinberg during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Lecture 1_Arguments, premises, and conclusions - Lecture 1...

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